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Kenosis: Self-Emptying Love 2, “The Gift of the Magi”

“Jesus said: Whoever has found the world and become rich should renounce the world . . . . The world is not worthy of one who finds himself.” — From The Gospel of Thomas

THE GIFT IS LOVE

Continuing with Cynthia Bourgeault’s insight into Jesus’s chosen kenotic path, I will forgo any introductory comments so as not to clutter the space with thoughts other than those presented in this excerpt from her book THE WISDOM JESUS:

A Pointless Sacrifice?

To flesh out a bit further what this path actually looks like, for­give me if I make a sudden leap into the world of modern litera­ture. Kenosis does not lend itself easily to spiritual theorizing. By far its most powerful and moving enactments have come in the form of story and drama.

One of the most precise descriptions of this path, believe it or not, is the familiar and well-loved story “The Gift of the Magi” by the American author O. Henry. You probably remember the tale. Della and James are newlyweds; they’re madly in love with each other. They are also poor as church mice, and their first Christmas together finds them without sufficient funds to buy each other gifts. But each of these lovers does have one prize possession. James owns a gold watch given to him by his grandfather; Della has stunning auburn hair falling all the way to her waist. Unbeknownst to Della, James pawns his gold watch in order to buy her beautiful silver combs for her hair. Unbe­knownst to James, Della cuts and sells her hair in order to buy him a gold watch chain. On Christmas eve the two of them stare bewilderedly at their completely useless gifts.  It has been a pointless sacrifice—pointless, that is, unless love itself is “the gift of the magi.”

And of course, this is exactly what O. Henry is getting at. In the voluntary relinquishing of their most cherished possessions, they make manifest what love really looks like; they give tangible shape to the bond that holds them together. That’s what kenosis is all about.

Another profoundly kenotic parable of our times is the tale that forms the 1987 movie Babette’s Feast, adapted from a short story by Isak Dinesen.  As the drama unfolds we discover that its heroine, Babette, had until recently been one of the most celebrated chefs in Paris, but during the political riots of 1871 she loses everything—restaurant, livelihood, and family. She flees for her life to rural Denmark and is taken in by two aging sisters who have given their lives to religious work, trying to hold together the spiritual community that their father founded. When Babette arrives, the remaining believers have grown old and weary, lost in petty bickering. Babette tries as best she can to lift their spirits, but nothing seems to be turning the situation around. Out of the blue a letter arrives informing her that she has won three million francs in a lottery back in Paris, and then and there she decides to treat these Danish peasants to a proper French dinner. She imports all the necessary ingredients: not only exotic gourmet delicacies for the seven-course meal itself (each with its appropriate wines, champagnes, and liqueurs) but the china dinnerware, silver cutlery, damask table cloths, and crystal glassware. The film zeroes in on the banquet table as the astonished Danish peasants are suddenly faced with this extrava­gant abundance. At first they are frightened and suspicious, but little by little the mood mellows as they slowly relax into gratitude and forgiveness. The last scene of that banquet night has them all stumbling, a bit drunk but very happy, out into the village square, where they form a circle around the fountain (a vivid image in its own right) and begin to sing and dance togeth­er. After all these years they have finally touched the wellspring, and their hearts are overflowing. Then someone says to Babette, “Well, I guess you’ll be leaving us soon, won’t you, now that you’re a rich woman?” She says, “Rich? I’m not rich. I spent every penny I had on that banquet, three million francs.”

Again we see the same leitmotif as in the O. Henry story. An extravagant sacrifice is in one sense wasted, because these poor peasants cannot really comprehend the magnitude of the gift, and by morning, when they’ve sobered up, they will probably have lost most of its beneficial effect. But no matter; the banquet table is set before them anyway. In her no-holds-barred generos­ity Babette offers these broken, dispirited souls a taste of reassur­ance that their long years of faithfulness have not been in vain. She mirrors to them what God is like, what love is like, what true humanness is like. And she does it precisely by throwing away her entire escape route in a single act of extravagant abundance, extravagant beyond the bounds of earth (and therefore invoking the presence of heaven). That’s the kenotic path.

Theologians have sometimes commented that if the goal of ascent mysticism is to bring about union through convergence at the point of origin, the effect of the kenotic path seems to be. self-disclosure and new manifestation. The act of self-giving brings new realms into being. It shows what God is like in new and different ways. Some of the most intuitive theologians of our times say that this is how the world was created in the first place—because, in the words of Karl Rahner, “God is the prodi­gal who squanders himself.” The act of self-giving is simulta­neously an act of self-communication; it allows something that was coiled and latent to manifest outwardly. “Letting go” (as in non-clinging, or self-emptying) is but a hair’s breadth away from letting be,” and our Judeo-Christian tradition remembers that it is through God’s original “Let there be . . . ” that our visible world tumbled into existence.

I love Cynthia’s authentic thinking and writing outside the box of conventional belief.  She presents a theology that I, as a former Catholic seminary student, can easily accept and understand at a heart level.  In my own published writings and blogging, I have ascribed to “ascent mysticism” as the path of ascension to the “point of origin” we think to be up in some Heaven, a point that Jesus himself taught is within.  When he reportedly ascended into Heaven, did he go up or within? 

There is a passage in my SACRED ANATOMY book where I contemplate this paradoxical dynamic.  The word “up” can be both dimensional and non-dimensional, or vibrational, as in moving up to a higher frequency.  The same is true of the word “down.” The biblical account of Jesus’s ascension indicates that he ascended into “the clouds of heaven.”

For example, I mentioned the “clouds of heaven.”  Jesus was seen by his disciples as ascending into the clouds above their heads. These clouds may have been the conditions in their own (transforming) collective consciousness through which the Lord of Love was making his royal exit from the earthly planes back into the higher planes of being from which he had come, and from which we all come—the “kingdom of heaven” which he had told them more than once “is within you.” This could also be the inference made by the two men in white apparel whom they reportedly saw standing with him and whom they heard say to them:  “Ye men of Galilee, why stand ye gazing up into heaven?  This same Jesus, which is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come in like manner as ye have seen him go into heaven.”  This may well be a classic case where the dimensional state simply did not comprehend the non-dimensional.  The darkness did not comprehend the light.  The lower planes simply cannot comprehend the higher.  But the one who stands in the midst of the seven golden candlesticks, the seven planes of being, in the fourth dimension has both physical and spiritual eyes and can see and comprehend the non-dimensional as clearly and easily as the dimensional.

I can appreciate Cynthia’s inference that Jesus descended down all the way—actually “into hell” according to the biblical text—in order to encompass and include all the dimensions of the vast spectrum of Creation in both heaven and earth, in the cycles of restoration, which he was very intentionally in the process of initiating.  In so doing he opened the gates to the Garden of Paradise here on Earth.  As Cynthia states so well in the next excerpt from this chapter, which I will publish in my next post:

It was not love stored up but love utterly poured out that opened the gates to the Kingdom of Heaven.

Until my next post, be love, be loved and be blessed.

Anthony

tpal70@gmail.com

Kenosis: The Path of Self-Emptying Love

IN THIS SERIES, I will explore the path of “Kenotic Love” as seen through the passionate heart and Christened mind of one of my favorite authors, Episcopal prelate Cynthia Bourgeault, who has rekindled in my heart an ecstatic love for the Man whom Mary Magdalene called “Rabboni”— and who knew her as his Beloved Companion — the romantic story about which I wrote a post back in August, 2018,  The Gospel of the Beloved Companion, which would be a timely read in this day of the rising Divine Feminine. Also my October post Fifth Way Love, A Romantic Path to Transformation.

In this post I will share excerpts from Cynthia’s book THE Wisdom Jesus — Transforming Heart and Mind.  This passage speaks to Jesus’s character and his message to humankind.  Christianity does not teach the Kenotic path that Jesus literally went down.

JUSUS  

There has always been a strong tendency among Christians to turn him into a priest —“our great high priest,” in the powerful metaphor of the New Testament Letter to the Hebrews. The image of Christos Pantokrator (“Lord of All Creation”) dressed in splendid sacramental robes has dominated the iconography of both Eastern and Western Christendom. But Jesus was not a priest. He had nothing to do with the temple hierarchy in Jeru­salem, and he kept a respectful distance from most ritual obser­vances. Nor was he a prophet in the usual sense of the term: a messenger sent to the people of Israel to warn them of impend­ing political catastrophe in an attempt to redirect their hearts to God.

Jesus was not interested in the political fate of Israel, nor would he accept the role of Messiah continuously being thrust upon him. His message was not one of repentance and return to the covenant. Rather, he stayed close to the perennial ground of wisdom: the transformation of human consciousness. He asked those timeless and deeply personal questions: What does it mean to die before you die? How do you go about losing your little life to find the bigger one? Is it possible to live on this planet with a generosity, abundance, fearlessness, and beauty that mir­ror Divine Being itself? These are the wisdom questions, and they are the entire field of Jesus’s concern. If you look for a comparable category today, the closest analogy would probably be the Sufi sheik who wields the threefold functions of wisdom teacher, spiritual elder, and channel for the direct transmission of blessing (baraka), in a fashion closely parallel to Jesus’s himself. The sheik is a distinctly Near Eastern category, and it probably best preserves the mantle that Jesus himself once wore. . . .

In order to go up one must first go all the way down.  For flesh to rise, spirit must first descend.  To ascend, one must fully incarnate.  I love how deeply Cynthia understands the kenotic path Jesus took.  

THE PATH OF KENOTIC LOVE

SO FAR WE have been looking at Jesus as typical of the wisdom tradition from which he comes. An enlightened master recognized by his followers as the Ihidaya, or the Single One, he teaches the art of metanoia, or “going into the larger mind.” Underlying all his teaching is a clarion call to a radical shift in consciousness: away from the alienation and polarization of the egoic operating system and into the unified field of divine abundance that can be perceived only through the heart. But how does one make this shift in consciousness? It’s one thing to admire it from a distance, but quite another to create it within oneself.

This is where spiritual praxis comes into play. “Praxis” means the path, the actual practice you follow to bring about the result that you’re yearning for. I think it’s fair to say that all of the great spiritual paths lead toward the same cen­ter—the emergence of this larger, non dual mind as the seat of personal consciousness—but they get there by different routes. While Jesus is typical of the wisdom tradition in his vision of what a whole and unified human being looks like, the route he lays out for getting there is very different from anything that had ever been seen on the planet up to that point. It is still radical in our own time and definitely the “road less taken” among the various schools of human transformation. I will fill in the pieces of this assertion as I go along, but my hunch is that a good many of the difficulties we sometimes run into trying to make our Christianity work stem from the fact that right from the start people missed how different Jesus’s approach really was. By trying to contain this new wine in old wineskins, they inadver­tently missed its own distinct flavor. In Jesus everything hangs together around a single center of gravity, and you need to know what this center is before you can sense the subtle but cohesive power of the path he is laying out.

What name might we give to this center? The apostle Paul suggests the word kenosis. In Greek the verb kenosein means “to let go,” or “to empty oneself,” and this is the word Paul chooses at the key moment in his celebrated teaching in Philippians 2:9-16 in order to describe what “the mind of Christ” is all about. Here is what he has to say:

Though his state was that of God, yet he did not deem equality with God something he should cling to.

Rather, he emptied himself, and assuming the state of a slave, he was born in human likeness.

He, being known as one of us,
humbled himself, obedient unto death,
even death on the cross.

For this, God raised him on high
and bestowed on him the name
which is above every other name.

So that at the name of Jesus,
every knee should bend in heaven and on earth and under the earth.

And so every tongue should proclaim
“Jesus Christ is Lord!” to God the Father’s glory.’

In this beautiful hymn, Paul recognizes that Jesus had only one “operational mode.” Everything he did, he did by self-emptying. He emptied himself and descended into human form.  And he emptied himself still further (“even unto death on the cross”) and fell through the bottom to return to the realms of dominion and glory. In whatever life circumstance, Jesus always responded with the same motion of self-emptying—or to put it another way, of the same motion of descent: going lower, taking the lower place, not the higher.

What makes this mode so interesting is that it’s almost com­pletely spiritually counterintuitive. For the vast majority of the world’s spiritual seekers, the way to God is “up.” Deeply embed­ded in our religious and spiritual traditions—and most likely in the human collective unconscious itself—is a kind of compass that tells us that the spiritual journey is an ascent, not a descent. Most students of the wisdom tradition consider this upward ori­entation to be one of the foundational attributes of sophia peren­nis itself, its origins no doubt archetypal.  While my own work with the wisdom Jesus has led me to disagree, it is hard to deny that the idea of spiritual ascent has been around for a long, long time. In biblical tradition, the image of the spiritual ladder goes all the way back to the headwaters of the Old Testament, with the story of Jacob’s dream of the ladder going up to heaven. It is probably five thousand years old. Christian monastic tra­dition returned to this image and developed it still further, as essentially the roadmap for the spiritual journey. The seventh century teacher John Climacus (“John of the Ladder”) even took his monastic name from this powerful image, and through his influential teachings it became the underlying philosophy of monastic practices such as lectio divina and psalmody.

Ascent mysticism was very much in the air in Jesus’s time as well. Earlier in this book I spoke of the Essene community, that apocalyptic Jewish sect whose visionary mysticism and ascetic practices were probably the most immediate formative influ­ence on Jesus. At the heart of the Essene understanding was a particular strain of spiritual yearning known as merkevah mysti­cism. Merkevah means “chariot,” an allusion to the Old Testa­ment story of the prophet Elijah being taken up to heaven in a chariot. This dramatic episode offered a vivid image of ascent to God, which the Essenes saw as applying both individually and for the entire people of Israel. “The end of the world was at hand,” and all eyes were gazing intently upward as Jesus took birth on
the earth.

To rise requires energy, in the spiritual realm as well as the physical one. And thus, the vast majority of the world’s spiritual technologies work on some variation of the principle of “conservation of energy.” Within each person there is seen to reside a sacred energy of being (sometimes known as the “chi,” or prana, the life force). This energy, in itself infinite, is measured out to each person in a finite amount and bestowed as our basic working capital when we arrive on this planet. The great spiritual tradi­tions have always taught that if we can contain this energy rather than letting it leach away—if we can concentrate it, develop it, make it more intentional and powerful—then this concentrated energy will allow us to climb that ladder of spiritual ascent. 

This ancient and universal strategy is really at the basis of all genuine asceticism (that is, asceticism in the service of conscious transformation, not as a means of penance or self-mortification). And there is good reason for this: the strategy works. Through the disciplines of prayer, meditation, fasting, and inner witness­ing the seeker learns how to purify and concentrate this inner reserve and to avoid squandering it in physical or emotional lust, petty reactions, and ego gratification. As self-mastery is gradu­ally attained, the spiritual energy concentrated within becomes strong enough and clear enough to sustain contact with those increasingly higher and more intense frequencies of the divine life, until at last one converges upon that unitive point. It’s a coherent and powerful path of inner transformation. But it’s not the only path.

There’s another route to center: a more reckless path and extravagant path, which is attained not through storing up that energy or concentrating the life force, but through throwing it all away-or giving it all away. The unitive point is reached not through the concentration of being but through the free squan­dering of it; not through acquisition or attainment but through self-emptying; not through “up” but through “down.” This is the way of kenosis, the revolutionary path that Jesus introduced into the consciousness of the West.
(to be continued)

THE PRAYER OF ST. FRANCIS

I will leave you to ponder this original prayer of St. Francis, believed to be written by a French Franciscan and based on a little known admonition Francis wrote to his friars, according to James Twyman. 

Where there is charity and wisdom, there is neither fear nor ignorance.

Where there is patience and humility, there is neither anger nor disturbance.

Where there is poverty (simplicity) with gladness, there is neither covetousness nor greed.

Where there is quiet and meditation, there is neither concern nor wandering.

Where there is love of God to guard the house (cf. Lk. 11:21), there the enemy cannot gain entry.

Where there is mercy and discernment, there is neither excess nor severity.

I am deeply thankful to God for life, for health, for serenity of mind and peace of heart.  I am particularly thankful at this time of harvest when we celebrate Thanksgiving for the abundance of Mother Nature as she clothes the trees with new leaves in the wake of devastating hurricanes.  I am profoundly thankful for my companion in life, Bonnie Lee, and for all our family on the West Coast.  Thank you, Lord, for the gift of their presence in our life and in our world.  To my readers and blog followers, a heartful appreciation for traveling with me these past several rich years of sharing the meditations of my heart.  I always enjoy your responses.  Until my next post,

Be love. Be loved. Be Thankful

Anthony

tpal70@gmail.com

“E Pluribus, Unum”

“When each person loves the other as much as he loves himself, then ‘one out of many’ becomes possible.” —Marcus Titulus Cicero

The motto of our nation displayed on its currency above the head of an eagle is “E Pluribus, Unum.”  It’s a Latin phrase lifted right out of the writings of Marcus Cicero. It translates as “Out of many, one.” Episcopal Bishop Michael Curry spoke to the usual meaning and significance of this motto on The Today Show in response to Samantha’s inquiry into a way in which we can find “common ground” in this divided nation of ours.  While it is obvious that the US is one nation of many diverse nationalities, we all share one Origin.

I would invert the order and meaning of these words to indicate that it is out of the ONE that the many proceed, as it has been from the Beginning of Creation.  Ex Uno, Multis: Out of the One, many.  Yet, even in the appearance of being “many,” we are one human race, one people, one species, one Body of Mankind, created to serve on Earth as the Body of God the Creator.  We’ve come a long ways down the many levels of Being over the long span of our sojourn in the material plane of manifest reality; about as low as we can come.     

I received a very thought-stimulating letter from one of my followers in the UK, Peter Watson.  It speaks for itself, so I will share it here without introduction. 

Dear Anthony, thank you for your fine wheel-illustration of how the power-of-love is conveyed to creation. 

           Doubtless there have been civilizations in the past. The idea of civilization, its purpose and motivation, is to improve our environment. In the present civilization, the starting-point of the caveman-stage of mankind’s rise from savagery, we toiled as hunter-gatherers, in hand-to-mouth existence. We progressed through an agricultural stage, an industrial revolution, and on to a technological space-age stage. Progress has been hampered only by conflicts of interest, between nations, and of course individuals and groups of individuals composing the nations.  

            Having come from a conflict-free realm, prior to conception, we took form in the relative safety of our mother’s womb. However, from birth onwards, and depending upon class, colour, and geographical location, it’s been anybody’s guess as to how well one might survive, let alone succeed, in the world of mankind. Somehow we weathered a compromised environment safely to a state of relative sanity, in which we can communicate with each other about sacred things. 

            Mankind’s world, unfortunately, does not share the safety of divine intervention. In their global disunity of struggle to rule by persuasion, or application, of armed might, contestants overlook the sovereignty of benign life to which we all owe our existence. 

            The enemy, when stripped of threat, or diplomatic camouflage, is fear. Fear gives license to defend; defense provokes attack. Hence a telling phrase – “survival of the fittest”– has been adopted and applied. To those assuming authority for law-and-order, this has meant armed-force; love, at best, is confined to human affection, but not to be trusted enough to control the destructive elements of human nature, such as jealousy, rage, hatred and fear. Although it is said that, “perfect love casts out fear”, nobody in public awareness, except one shining individual, has put that statement-of-truth to the test. 

            Learning of war, or defense, is as endless as the escalation of fear motivating defesce and attack. Peace has been thought of as ascendency of the fittest, or the most technologically-advanced, or the mightiest, as the fearful means overcoming the enemy. 

            For millennia, global growth has been punctuated by recovery from exhaustion, repairs of defense-mechanisms, and the replenishing of more highly refined arsenals, between wars. 

            During lapses of aggression, some philosophies have explored the power-of-thought – “the pen is mightier than the sword”, and so forth – but without adopting the ability of learning to think from truly peaceful motivation.

            Philosophy, the same as war-strategy, is biased in thought eclipsed by fear. The higher the leadership roles, and responsibility for protection, the greater is the invisible ogre of fear. As said by ‘through-a-glass-darkly’ Saint Paul,  

And even things without life giving sound, whether pipe or harp, except they give a distinction in the sounds, how shall it be known what is piped or harped?   For if the trumpet gives an uncertain sound, who shall prepare himself to the battle? . . . . For God is not the author of confusion, but of peace, as in all churches of the saints.

Harrumph! What is this talk of battle? God speaks ‘as of a trumpet’, but not for battle. Love does not ordain battle; only fear can do that.  Job too, when motivated by fear, recognized, “For the thing which I greatly feared is come upon me, and that which I was afraid of is come unto me.

           So, civilization has brought with it a measure of fear and greed; perhaps understandably so for the cave-dwellers, as scavengers in a harsh environment, but surely there is less need of fear or greed in a world of such abundance in many parts. Imagine if those emotional-controls of fear and greed were ousted from human hearts by the provision of generosity, which so easily and recognizably characterizes the Giver of the spirit of life that freely animates us. 

            Is this just wishful thinking, or plain common-sense? Surely those in authority could and should recognize that if the uncreative [and destructive] motivations of fear and greed prevail unaddressed, there will be nothing left for anybody, which is basically what caused the demise of earlier civilizations, albeit in some other form, such as flooding and ice. 

            When ‘those-in-authority’ are mentioned, let it not be confused with those in positions of power and might by armed force; they represent the Caesars of this world, who know not love, nor the authority of life. A Good Learner is one who learns from life, not how to lead life. 

            It may be difficult for the human mind to picture the original state of Eden, prior to the need for civilization, or what happened to Eden to give rise to a condition that needed civilizing. The best we may be able to do on that score, is to ignore for a moment the way the world around us is now, and think instead of the perfection of the realm we all originate in, and come from, prior to conception. With some sacred thought, we can remember that state-of-perfection, because we were there. 

            Just as there is life after death, there is life before birth, and this is from where we originate, exactly the same as Eden, which has since become Earth. Thank you for your invitation to suggest a topic for meditation. My proposal for a new blog, Anthony, is to exercise our imagination, and memory-skills, to teleport consciousness to that time ‘in the beginning’, before the so-called Fall of man was initiated. 

            There are two significant reasons for suggesting this spiritual research; the first and most important being to clear the Name of God from any complicity in the cause of the Fall, and secondly, but just as importantly, to clear the name of Man from having been tarred by the same brush by which Adam and Eve have been tarred by theological and religious superstition.  With love and light, Peter

I appreciate my reader’s suggestion. It’s a worthy topic.  I had another letter from a dear friend who suggested I write in a more positive and uplifting mode:

Dearest Tony,
Thank you for your blog posts. It is so wonderful to feel your strong
Vibrant Spirit. Could it be helpful right now to focus on gratitude, knowing
What truly Is, and Awe?   —Alice

I am more inclined to go with Alice’s suggestion.  Actually, I have written extensively on the subject of our Edenic origins.  There’s a passage I borrowed from Richard Heinberg’s book MEMORIES AND VISIONS OF PARADISE that describes the spirit and demeanor of our ancestors and the quality of life in Eden. I will bring it forward here as a clear reminder of how we were — one that may trigger memories and visions of Paradise:  

The myths and traditions of the ancients do not portray Eden as the sort of technological Paradise that our present civilization tends to project into the future. If the Golden Age really existed, it must instead have been, as the Chinese describe it, an Age of Perfect Virtue—an age in which . . .

. . . they were upright and correct, without knowing that to be so was righteousness; they loved one another, without knowing that to do so was benevolence; they were honest and leal-hearted with­out knowing that it was loyalty; they fulfilled their engagements, without knowing that to do so was good faith; in their simple movements they employed the services of one another, without thinking that they were conferring or receiving any gift. There­fore their actions left no trace, and there was no record of their affairs.” ¹

Moving on now, I pose this question for consideration: How do we think this quality of life came about?  How was it created?  Well, we can go to the Creation Story itself in the Book of Genesis for an answer:

“And the Earth was without form and void, and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters and God said ‘Let there be light.'”. . . and all else that followed.

In truth, all of creation that followed the creation of light was created out of light — and sound: “God said let there be. . . .”  The Word, the vibration of Love, of God’s Triune Spirit of Love, of Truth, and of Life, when given expression through the mouth of God, is made flesh and takes form in the physical planes of Being.  We are the mouth of God here on this physical plane of Being.  We are the creators of this world, and we can let it be the way we want it to be or the way that God intended it to be from the very beginning: a Paradise.  I don’t see where there’s any other option. 

Eden will be restored to Earth when we human beings consistently and clearly express the triune Spirit of God in our living.  It can come about in no other way but when we LET the Spirit of God move upon the face of the waters of our consciousness, upon which there is gross darkness.  Ex Uno, Multis. Out of the One Spirit, many. ♥

“Kenotic Love”

In my next posts, I will explore the path of “Kenotic Love” as seen through the heart of one of my favorite authors, Cynthia Bourgeault.  I will include excerpts from the inspired writings of another favorite of mine, poet and diva Diana Durham, who recently penned these words of wisdom: 

If we learn to stay true to ourselves, to feel when new insight lines up inside, or in Emerson’s words, ‘to detect and watch that gleam of light’ when it flashes across our minds, we are less likely to become controlled by others. We get a ‘feel’ for when something is right for us, or not. While we maintain our alignment, the ‘relationship’ of mind and heart, Adam and Eve, remains harmonious and effective. What is happening inside us is that we have taken on the identity of a creator — some one who authors and shapes their own world. This is the meaning of the word ‘authenticity’.

I just love such freeing and onward-looking writings and enjoy sharing them. Any thoughts you wish to share?  I welcome them. Until my next post,  

Be love.  Be loved

Anthony

tpal70@gmail.com 

¹ Richard Heinberg, MEMORIES and VISIONS of PARADISE — Exploring the Universal Myth of a Lost Golden Age. 

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