Creating the New Earth Together

Hunger for Meaning

“…the greatest hunger of all, is the hunger for meaning.”

“The Bushmen in the Kalahari Desert talk about the two “hungers”. There is the Great Hunger and there is the Little Hunger. The Little Hunger wants food for the belly; but the Great Hunger, the greatest hunger of all, is the hunger for meaning…
There is ultimately only one thing that makes human beings deeply and profoundly bitter, and that is to have thrust upon them a life without meaning.

There is nothing wrong in searching for happiness. But of far more comfort to the soul is something greater than happiness or unhappiness, and that is meaning. Because meaning transfigures all. Once what you are doing has for you meaning, it is irrelevant whether you’re happy or unhappy. You are content – you are not alone in your Spirit – you belong.” –Laurens van der Post (Photograph of Sir Laurens Van Der Post, with a Bushman in the Kalahari Desert.)

A friend posted this on Facebook this morning and it resonated with what I have been thinking deeply about this week in the wake of my grandson’s graduation from High School last month up in Ashland, Oregon. I sent him my blessing in a letter in which I offered a few morsels of wisdom and insight into life. I wrote

As your paternal grandfather, I bestow upon you the blessings of your forefathers and mine. With this blessing comes the responsibility to be fruitful in your life. Your life will bear fruit as you pursue what it is you love doing that also serves and benefits others, and you have plenty of examples and role models in your immediate family of fruitful living. You can look to them, to us, for guidance along the way at any time. I am available to you for as long as I am present in this world.

Throughout my life and professional career as a holistic practitioner, I have found much meaning in serving others. The meaning of my entire life has been in serving others. It has been for me as though there are no “others” but only One being with many diverse and colorful faces, of which I am but one such expression. As I gave to others I was giving to myself. For me, there is no greater meaning one can find in life than giving of oneself in service to others.

Lead forth with Spirit

Further on in my letter I offered this assurance and encouragement to my grandson:

You are 18 now, and that number resolves to a 9 in numerology. Nine is the symbol of a completed cycle bringing forth. The circle on top represents the cycle completed, and the line coming down from the circle represents the One you are coming forth into your world to begin a new cycle, a new day. What you will create in this next cycle is entirely up to you. You have all that you need in yourself to achieve your presence in this world and to bring forth your gift. Always remember that Life provides for your needs at all times. All you need do is ask and you will receive from within; seek and you will find what you are looking for; knock and the way will open up before you. Just keep moving and your life will take form as you go forward. Lead forth with your spirit. All else will follow. . . .

Spirit. How many youngsters graduating from our scholastic institutions come away with an awareness of the importance of their spirit? “Lead forth with my spirit? You’ve got to be kidding. It’s my education that will get me what I want and need out of life: success, money, identity and meaning.”  That’s what we were taught, and look where it’s got us.  Mark Twain had a way of saying things that made people think: “I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.”  The school of life is the one that matters, and one lives with or without a higher education.  Spiritual education matters most. As we lead forth with our spirit, with our hearts through which spirit works, our minds with their concepts and ideas will follow to help in providing form for our dreams and aspirations born of spirit. But it’s spirit, vibration, that shapes our worlds.

The word education has the Latin root Educare which means to draw forth.  What is there to be drawn forth by our teachers? Obviously that which is already there within the student: genius, creativity, something that’s new and unique, that’s not yet been given or seen! Something the world is waiting for and for which the times are ripe! Something that will make a difference in the world.

When our older son was setting out to make his life, he told me he just wanted to make a difference in the world. And so he has indeed. He didn’t go to college either. For as long as I’ve known him, he has led forth with his beautiful and creative spirit and zest for life. He is truly, and in every practical way, the light of his world. And his world gathered around him in rich abundance, pressed down and running over. Our younger son is having the same experience in his life. “Stuff” has a way of coming to those who love what they are doing in life, and in good measure and balance.

You see, the world is nothing but coagulated energy, made of light and sound vibrating at a myriad of frequencies. Energy is vibration and vibration shapes our worlds. The vibration of the light of love originates in spirit and is an attractive energy that draws substance together in a cohesive whole. The vibrations of greed and competition, on the other hand, originate in ego and are dissipating energies that require great effort in order to hold onto the stuff one accumulates to fill one’s world and hopefully give one a sense of meaning and value. Only it doesn’t. Meaning and value are not to be derived from stuff. They are inherent within our very being. We are human beings not human doings. Our meaning and value is in who we are as creators and not in what we do and create in our lives — and the nature of our meaning and value has very much to do with the times and places in which we were each placed.

We were made for these times and this place!

I said this in my letter to my grandson that I hope will give set him in search for his meaning:

And remember to give thanks in all things, no matter how hectic and turbulent things may get – and they will. Just keep looking up and, like the proverbial bar of soap, you will go up when squeezed. You can handle whatever comes to you, for you were made precisely for these times.

I am proud of you for simply being who you are, for who and what you are is enough. Always remember that. You are enough. As you mature spiritually, you will come to discover and reveal your Higher Self, that which we all seek to know more fully: our Self. But for now, you are enough. Now, go forth and shine your sweet and beautiful light, your unique gift to us all and to the world. You are the light of your world. Shine brightly so that you can see the way before you.

A wise teacher once said “It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness.” We live in dark times, but it doesn’t help any to complain about them. We were each and every one of us made precisely and purposefully for these times. It doesn’t take a college education or a degree to see what is needed in our times. Should we need a reminder, we have the Peace Prayer of St. Francis to revisit from time to time. I’ll leave you with it.

Lord, make me an instrument of your peace:
where there is hatred, let me sow love;
where there is injury, pardon;
where there is doubt, faith;
where there is despair, hope;
where there is darkness, light;
where there is sadness, joy.

O divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek
to be consoled as to console,
to be understood as to understand,
to be loved as to love.
For it is in giving that we receive,
it is in pardoning that we are pardoned,
and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life.
Amen.

Just reading this prayer ignites and fans a flame in the heart. “Let there be peace on earth and let it begin with me.” Yes! There is genuine meaning and purpose in these words. May they be a light in the world unto our young boys and girls of this new generation who face greater challenges than I know I did when I graduated from high school and college a few decades ago. God bless them each one and keep them safe.

Until my next post,

Be love. Be loved

Anthony

Read my HealthLight Newsletter online for helpful guidance and information.

 

“And God said, let us make man in our image, after our likeness” — Genesis

Are we evolved spiritually enough to resume the role of co-creators of our human species using genetic engineering? This is the question I was left asking as I finished reading Dan Brown’s INFERNO a few days ago. (If you’re planning to read the book, then don’t read here any further as I don’t wish to give away the ending for you. Come back to it after reading the book.)

The last chapters of Dan’s book present a solution to overpopulation that may well be worth considering (if it is at all achievable): genetic sterilization of one-third of the human population — the same percentage of the population of Europe that was wiped out in three years by the Bubonic (Black) Plague in the mid fourteenth century (1347-50), nature’s way of purging the cancerous growth of the human population. With genetic engineering, however, there would be no plague, no bodies in the streets and no hospitals overflowing with the sick and dying.

The “villain” in the novel, genetic engineer and “Transhumanist” Bertrand Zobrist, “who believed we are living on the threshold of a glittering ‘posthuman’ age…of true transformation,” developed a highly contagious airborne DNA-altering virus vector and released it into the water and air in Instanbul, Turkey. In a matter of a few weeks, “Inferno,” the name he gave his creation, had gone viral and had, as planned, infected one-third of the world’s human population. There were no symptoms, no side-effects, and no one knew they were infected and, therefore, sterile.

This does sound like some “Orwellian dystopia of the future,” as professor Robert Langdon thought to himself  upon hearing what Zobrist had done. Moments later he found himself arguing in favor of such a radical but promising breakthrough in genetic engineering. “Bertrand Zobrist has redesigned our species . . . in an attempt to save us . . . transforming us into a less fruitful population.”  Sienna Brooks, Zobrist’s long-time lover, protege, and now conflicted defender who set out to destroy the virus vector before it could be released, confesses her fear:

The most frightening thing of all is not that Inferno causes sterility, but rather that it has the ability to do so. An airborne viral vector is a quantum leap — years ahead of its time. Bertrand has suddenly lifted us out of the dark ages of genetic engineering and launched us headlong into the future. He has unlocked the evolutionary process and given humankind the ability to define our species in broad, sweeping strokes. Pandora has opened her box, and there’s no closing it now. Bertrand has created the key to modify the human race . . . and if those keys fall into the wrong hands, then God help us. This technology should never have been created. . . .

Professor Langdon was confused about her conflicted state of mind. If she wanted to destroy the virus, he argued, why did she not cooperate with Dr. Elizabeth Sinskey and the World Health Organization, which she headed up, or report it to the Center for Disease Control or some other government agency? Sienna replied and Robert responds:

“You can’t be serious! Government agencies are the last entities on earth that should have access to this technology! Think about it, Robert. Throughout all of human history, every groundbreaking technology ever discovered by science has been weaponized — from simple fire to nuclear power — and almost always at the hands of powerful governments. Where do you think our biological weapons come from? They originate from research done in places like WHO and CDC. Bertrand’s technology — a pandemic virus used as a genetic vector — is the most powerful weapon ever created. It paves the way for horrors we can’t yet even imagine, including targeted biological weapons. Imagine a pathogen that attacks only those people whose genetic code contains certain ethnic markers. It would enable widespread ethnic cleansing on the genetic level.”

“I see your concerns, Sienna, I do, but this technology could also be used for good, couldn’t it? Isn’t this discovery a godsend for genetic medicine? A new way to deliver global inoculations for example?”

“Perhaps, but unfortunately, I’ve learned to expect the worst from people who hold power.”

I couldn’t argue with her on that point. There’s simply too much hunger for power-and-control in the world, especially in the governing sector. We have to grow up — mentally, emotionally, and especially spiritually.

How would it work?

Well, let’s look at the math to see how this technology might work. There are approximately 7-billion people on Earth at this time. We are adding about 100-million people each year to the population (250,000 each day, rain or shine). The graph is an exponential curve. By the middle of the current twenty-first century, there will be approximately 9-billion people competing for food and shelter on earth. Now, one-third of the current 7-billion population would be about 2.3-billion. With 2.3-billion people made sterile and, therefore, not having babies, that would reduce the number of new people added to the population each year.

Now, it is estimated that 7-billion people will add 2-billion to the population by the year 2050 for a total of 9-billion. Two-thirds of 7-billion, or 4.7-billion fertile humans, would add roughly only 1.2-billion babies to the population by the middle of this century, for a total of 8.2-billion as opposed to 9-billion. Now, only two-thirds of that 1.2-billion humans would be fertile, thus a winnowing of the human population at a manageable rate would take place over time, reducing the birth-rate until the population curve actually inverts and our total numbers begin to decrease.

A moral question

Repeating the question I posed at the top of this post: Are we evolved spiritually enough to resume the role of co-creators of our human species using genetic engineering? After all, we are gods incarnate. Collectively, we are the Creators of our species, according to the plural subject in Genesis: “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.” Who are “us” that created man in “our” image and likeness in the Beginning?  Are we not the Creators of our very own species?

My personal opinion?

I think genetic engineering to turn the exponential curve of population growth around is a great idea whose time has not yet come. We have a long ways to go before we can be trusted with such technology. The mentally oriented human ego is yet too self-centered and self-serving to be trusted with the awesome responsibility of engineering the genetic material of the human body. We are still blind to the consequences of our own actions. Just because we can do something doesn’t mean that we should.  A case in point: science and medicine are working at helping people live longer, healthier lives while utterly ignoring the current crisis of overpopulation — a topic I will explore further in my next post. It’s what Bertrand Zobrist was working on before he woke up to the stark realization of where extending longevity would inevitably take the human species. What do you think? Share your thoughts, if you like. I would love to hear them. Until my next post, then,

Be love. Be loved.

Anthony

Read my Health Light Newsletter online at LiftingTones.com.

 

 

I’m reading Dan Brown’s latest release INFERNO, and I must say the scenario depicted in the story is uncomfortably realistic. The bottom line is the blatant fact that the human species has terminal cancer simply based on the etiology and definition of cancer: the uncontrolled replication of cells. In other words, exponential growth with no checks and balances.

Here’s a passage from the book that gave me pause. It’s Bertrand Zobrist, the villain and mad scientist in the story, who’s solution to overpopulation and inevitable demise of the human race is to create a plague by releasing a virus into the water, explaining to Dr. Elizabeth Sinskey, the biologist who heads up the World Health Organization (WHO), the data behind his doomsday scenario.

“Consider this. It took the earth’s population thousands of years–from the early dawn of man all the way to the early 1800’s–to reach one billion people. Then, astoundingly, it took only about a hundred years to double the population to two billion in the 1920’s. After that it took a mere fifty years for the population to double again to four billion in the 1970’s. As you can imagine, we’re well on track to reach eight billion very soon. Just today, the human race added another quarter-million people to planet Earth. A quarter million. And this happens every day–rain or shine. Currently, every year, we’re adding the equivalent of the entire country of Germany.”

Based on these mathematical determinants alone, by the middle of the current twenty-first century, the population of Earth will have reached nine billion people. It is estimated that the earth can comfortably support about four billion people with her natural resources. Is this the “elephant in the room” that no one wants to talk about? Dr. Sinskey defends her organization against Zobrist’s accusation that the WHO is ignoring the problem by citing its recent spending of millions of dollars sending doctors into Africa to deliver free condoms and educate the people about birth control. Zobrist counters by citing the activity of Catholic missionaries who poured in behind the WHO and told the Africans that if they used the condoms they would all go to hell. The result was a new environmental issue of landfills overflowing with unused condoms. As the conversation unfolds, Zobrist points to a passage in the works of  Florentine Renaissance historian, Niccolo Machiavelli:

“When every province of the world so teems with inhabitants that they can neither subsist where they are nor remove themselves elsewhere, the world will purge itself.”

In my lifetime, the population of Earth has nearly doubled. Will my children and grandchildren and their babies see and experience the painful but inevitable purge of the human species? Are we now poised on the precipice of Dante Alighieri’s INFERNO, book one of his Divine Comedy, with its seven “rings” of hell and sea of human bodies wallowing in their own waste and begging for death to end their misery? And, as Dante proposes, must we pass through hell and purgatory in order to arrive at Paradise? In other words, is there a Golden Age to follow this dark age we seem to be entering?

Every Tuesday now as the garbage truck stops in front of our house to dump our trash dumpster into its huge belly, I wonder how long it will take us to run out of space for landfills. In my youthful days, we had a burning barrel for paper trash, dug a hole for cans and bottles, and carried out food scraps in a slop bucket to feed to the hogs and chickens.  But those days are long gone. Thankfully, we have recycling today to take care of much of our paper and other solid waste–and we have a compost bin for our food waste and back-yard garden–if only everyone took responsibility to collect their recyclables and deliver them to the collection sites.  I see so much laziness and lack of caring for the Earth in our town. I want to knock at doors and say “Wake up! Don’t you see where this carelessness is headed?! Take care of your Home!”

I will leave you with this encouraging fact in the world of physics. For every disintegrative process there is an integrative process taking place. It’s a universal principle of cosmic economy. Some of us have the job of managing and stewarding the disintegrative process, and others of us are employed in the integrative process (and there is a new integrative process underway, has been for some time only the news media doesn’t cover it.) It’s the nature of the Creative Process to “waste not, want not,” as my wife says and her mother before her — and balance is maintained at all cost. So will it be for our human species and planetary Home among the stars.

As always, I welcome your thoughts and comments. Until my next post,

Be love. Be loved.

Anthony.

Read my Health Light Newsletter online at LiftingTones.com.

Port Arthur, Texas was my geographical port of entry to this planet 77 years ago today, May 20, 1940. Mother was using midwives for the deliveries back then. I was number three of eight siblings who survived birth. A ninth didn’t make it.

Dad’s entire life was his family along with his trade as a master machinist. He worked for Standard Brass in Port Neches, Texas during the war years making bullets and bombs. I don’t know why he and his fellow workers were never considered part of the Armed Forces and therefore eligible for military pensions. Sure, he didn’t have to go fight the battles abroad, thankful as I am for that.  But those that did have to go would have been useless without ammo in their guns and bombs in their bays. Dad was home during the war busy raising a family with our Mom beside him and birthing offspring. There was purpose in his drive to procreate. He wanted to supply his beloved Church with priests and nuns, as Mom revealed in her old age. Dad’s life ended at sixty-one with a massive heart attack. (I lucked out with his genes at age sixty-two with a coronary bypass.) Dad didn’t have time for doctors. I wish he had. I was just beginning to know him and enjoy his presence in my life.

In 1944-45 Dad moved his growing family to Lake Charles. He bought a deep acre lot with a two-bedroom-one-bath house on Sallier Street, just across the railroad track that formed the southern city limits. Most of the roads were graveled, including South (now Ryan) and Lake Streets, and, of course, our Sallier Street.

Being outside the city limits, Dad built a small milk-farm, which I will always cherish as the most meaningful and practical setting for my education and character-development. I milked cows before and after school, fed chickens and ducks and sloped hogs, raised rabbits and calves for meat, built fences and strung electric wires to keep the cows in the pasture (and learned never to pee on one again!). With more girls than boys – seven to three with Mom and Dad – in a house with only one bathroom, we did our pissing behind a tree or in the barnyard. God, I loved that little farm. So many happy memories, not the least of them is the bonfires we were free to have outside the city limits. Then the city moved the southern border to take in our farm and we had to dismantle it.

By that time I was well on my way to becoming a priest in Lafayette, Louisiana, away from home and all the drama that played out with my sisters. My brother had joined me at the seminary but didn’t stay very long. At fourteen, I was enamored by the priestly life of prayer and solitude, on one hand, and on the other by the stability and security the priesthood offered. Besides, my dad seemed really happy with my choice of vocation, which made it much harder to leave the seminary seven years later.

Speaking of seven years, my life’s journey has unfolded in seven-year cycles, as it probably does for everyone. At age seven, I began my schooling in the first grade at St. Charles Academy. There was no kindergarten back then. I finished my junior high school at Landry Memorial High School by age fourteen, when I entered seminary at Immaculata Minor Seminary, which is located on the Breaux Bridge Highway in Lafayette, our mother’s stomping grounds when she was an orphan. She was born in Rayne and adopted by a cotton farmer in the Breaux Bridge area, where she was reared. I loved my mother very much and felt close to her during those seven years of seminary training.  She wrote me often, as I did her. She had the most beautiful penmanship. I promised that I would take care of her in my own home when she grew old, but that was not to be.

I spent six years in minor seminary and one year at Notre Dame Major Seminary in New Orleans, where I met a chiropractor who worked what I thought were little miracles with my health. So impressed was I with his method of health care that I left Notre Dame and went off to chiropractic college in Indianapolis, Indiana at age twenty-one. My dad’s belief and use of chiropractic made my decision to leave seminary a lot easier.  I think he was happy for me and with my change in vocation.  I know Mom was.  She was always supportive of me in my life’s journey.

I graduated from Chiropractic college at age twenty-three, met and married a wonderful woman of German descent, Jane Ellen Kriner, who had two daughters, Elizabeth and Patricia. We moved straightway to Louisiana — at her encouragement, I might add, and with the excitement of her daughters — to begin my career as a chiropractor and natural healthcare practitioner.

We settled in Crowley, a small rice-farming community an hour’s drive from home, where we soon bought an antebellum house that had served as a medical clinic for some thirty years, which we renovated as a home-office combination. In Crowley we ran squarely into the medical prejudice against chiropractors. Even the parish priest where we attended church was preaching against the “quackery” of chiropractic. This encounter broadsided me and woke me up to the reality of the times. We lost a court battle over a zoning infraction with our office in a residential zone, which had been rezoned without the realtor telling us. At the same time, a colleague in the Baton Rouge area invited me to join him in his busy practice. So, we moved to Baton Rouge, which was our home base for some fourteen years.

Over the weekend of May 19/20, 1967, I attended a seminar that completely redirected my life and the life of my wife and two daughters. Dr. William Bahan, who was giving the seminar on how to put your life and service on a “giving basis,” was to become my beloved mentor and friend. In 1968 I was introduced to Lord Martin Cecil, who was to become my spiritual mentor for the next twenty years. I was completing four cycles of seven years.

To start my fifth seven-year cycle, in 1969 we adopted a little baby boy whose mother was one of my younger sisters.  We were barren and Leo Fredrick, as we named him after our own fathers, was a love-child and a gift from God.

In 1973 we moved our family to Sunrise Ranch in Loveland, Colorado, to attend a three-month class in the Art of Living. When we returned home, we became active in our newfound spiritual community as residential members of an Emissary Center in Baton Rouge. Six years later, we were blessed once again with our first and only offspring of our marriage, another sweet love-child whom we named John Anthony, after our own namesakes.

In 1980 we moved again, this time into the New Orleans area where I joined a friend and colleague in his practice, eventually winding up in Belle Chasse, a suburb of New Orleans, where we lived and worked for six years. Then, in 1986, a growing crisis erupted in our marriage that ended it. Easter Sunday took on new and significant meaning when Jane and our son, John, drove away to start a new life back home in Indiana. I was left with our older son Leo in the Crescent City to find my way to a new cycle and direction in life and to helping Leo find his life.  Our shared-journey’s end completed my seventh seven-year life cycle.  With Leo married now and off to join the Navy, I moved back home in 1988 to take care of our aging mother in Lake Charles. I was forty-eight and winding up my seventh seven-year life cycle.

As I began my eighth cycle and celebrated my fiftieth trip around the sun, I met my best friend and travel companion Bonnie Lee Fisher on Earth Day 1990 and we have journeyed together to this day. We courted for ten years before entering a fully married and eventful relationship in 2001 with an outdoor wedding at Sunrise Ranch in Loveland, Colorado, surrounded by family and friends.  We flew up to Niagra Falls for our honeymoon. Loving her has been a joy as well as a source of much spiritual and personal growth.

A memorable event was officiating as a celebrant at Marcus and Khara’s wedding, Bonnie’s son and daughter-in-law. The following year held the major and surprise event of bypass surgery on Easter Sunday in Fort Collins, Colorado, giving me a new lease on life as I started my ninth seven-year life cycle at age sixty-three the following year.

Much has happened in the last fourteen years since my heart surgery. I started publishing Health Light Newsletter in 2004 and published my first book, Sacred Anatomy, in 2005 and my workshop manual in 2007 in preparation for my first Attunement with Sacred Sound workshop intensive at Glenn Ivy Retreat and Conference Center in Corona, California. That same year I published “Rediscovering the Soul of Chiropractic,” a reprint in booklet format of an article I wrote for our professional magazine Today’s Chiropractic in 2000. I then retired from active practice and went up to Ashland, Oregon to spend some time with my two sons and grandchildren. Bonnie and I had taken a breather from one another and rejoined our lives and shared journey upon my return from Oregon.

In 2008 we rented out our house and moved up to Sunrise Ranch Conference and Retreat Center in Loveland, Colorado, where I studied sound healing with Jonathan Goldman and continued to developed and teach a workshop in Attunement with Sacred Sound, completing my tenth seven-year cycle at age 70. Our boys had moved to the West Coast with the grandkids and we followed them to San Francisco, California and Ashland, Oregon. We really enjoyed the rugged Pacific Northwest Coast.

Upon our return home in 2011, I went into part time practice as a health coach in the Holistic Healing Arts, the name I gave my office space in the American Wellness Center in Lake Charles. Since then I’ve been offering my services in clinical nutrition, attunement energy work and sound healing. I made my final contribution to the field of the Sacred Healing Arts by publishing my second book Attunement With Sacred Sound in 2015, bringing my eleventh seven-year cycle to completion presenting my work as part of an attunement workshop intensive offered by a friend and colleague at Still Meadow Retreat and Conference Center in Portland, Oregon.

I continue to serve where I am needed and received. My two blogs, HealingTones.org and LiftingTones.com (my Health Light Newsletter online) are visited by readers from all parts of the globe thanks to the Internet. Life is good, and my journey has been full of blessings along the way from friends I cherish and hold dear with infinite appreciation. The Lord has been good to me, providing all of my needs all of my days, for which I thank and praise Him daily.

So many friends posted Happy Birthday wishes on my FB wall. Gosh! I am floating in happiness! Spent the day with a colleague who came through on his way to New Orleans who gifted me with a wonderful and much needed complete body stretch and alignment. After which Bonnie and I drove down to the Gulf for an evening of solitude and beach-coming stroll in the salty sea waters.  Thank you one and all for your love and happy wishes.

Tony

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Chorale PicI have always had a peculiar feeling of resistance when I hear the words “In Jesus’ name we pray,” with which preachers end their prayers – mostly Protestant and Baptist preachers, as rarely if ever have I heard Catholic priests utter these words. It just doesn’t ring true to me as something required of us in order to connect with God the Father in prayer. Jesus himself instructed that when we pray we should enter into our closet and pray directly to the Father in secret.

Now, I think I know the source of this tradition. Somewhere in the Biblical account of Jesus’ public ministry, he is recorded by the Evangelists as having indicated that “No one comes to the Father except through me.” He is also recorded as saying “Whatever you ask of the Father in my name, he will give it to you.” Later on the Catholic Church made it a dogma that states unequivocally that no one comes to the Father except through the Son.

Now, in the Aramaic tongue, which Jesus spoke, the word for name is shem, which means shimmer or vibration.  When someone is said to “come in the name of the Lord,” in Aramaic it means one who comes in the tone or vibration of love, love being the shem of Jesus, the Lord of Love. So, to ask the Father “in my name” is to ask in love, not to get something from God but to give something to God, namely glory, as well as to give something to one’s world, namely creative action.

When Jesus was teaching his disciples how to pray, he gave them what has come to be known the world around as “The Lord’s Prayer.” Interestingly, this prayer does not end with the words “In Jesus’ name we pray.” Nor does it begin with words invoking the Father through Jesus’ name.  According to the record, Jesus instructed “When you pray, pray thus: “Our Father, which art in heaven, hallowed be thy name…etc.”  Then it ends with these words – which, for some peculiar reason, the Catholic version of this prayer omits: “For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory forever. Amen.” (Matt. 6:9-13)

Jesus instructed his disciples to address the Father directly, and not as his Father but as “Our Father.” This leaves me with the impression that someone put a spin on this Gospel text. It seems they put words into Jesus’ mouth when they wrote the Gospels that have been handed down to us by Catholic theologians at the Council of Nicea. As we saw in previous posts, the Council of Nicea was convened by the pagan Emperor Constantine in the fourth century after Jesus (325 AD).  This was when the Catholic Church was created along with the dogmas that were to be taught and upheld by all Christians.

This was also likely when the phrase “In Jesus’ name” was owned and capitalized on by the Church, which in essence decreed that the only way to God was through the Church and its priesthood. This really does reveal the Judaic roots of Christianity. Judaism had its High Priest who alone was permitted to enter the Holy of Hollies in the Jewish temple. No one came to the God of Abraham except through the High Priest of the Temple. Direct communication with God by the layman was taught and believed to simply not be available. Yet, we have Jesus’ words instructing us to address the Father directly when we pray. I find this most interesting.

Where was Mother God?

What also strikes me as peculiar is the absence of the Divine Feminine, Mother God, in this prayer as it was translated from the original Aramaic text into the English language — and I may step on some patriarchal toes here. From my studies of the original Aramaic prayer of Jesus, I learned that the first word of this prayer, Abwoon, invokes both Father and Mother God, and the word for kingdom, malkuthakh, is a feminine word which means queendom and not kingdom. So, let’s have a closer look into the nature and purpose of this prayer of Jesus, which actually has ancient roots. It was a prayer that was used to initiate a new cycle of creative venture.

The Aramaic language is a sound-based language as distinguished from the meaning-based English language, so that in simply voicing this prayer out loud, one sends forth in his or her creative field energetic frequencies that begin to establish a new vibrational terrain – which we can call a “new heaven” – for the creation of something entirely new – which we can call a “new earth.” So, let’s have a look at each line of this Aramaic Prayer of Jesus.

The Aramaic Prayer of Jesus

As I said, Aramaic is a sound-based, rather than meaning-based, language. So, it really can’t be translated literally word for word. When spoken or chanted, however, it carries our spirit forth to accomplish absolutely that which we intend.  Above all, it sends our Word before us to clear the path upon which we are about to embark of all the clutter of yesterday’s successes and failures. It literally renews the path of our life’s journey so that something new may unfold that’s not a repetition of the past.

The invocation itself creates sacred space for the Great Spirit of Father/Mother God to enter and be with us as we initiate a new cycle. Praying this particular Prayer of Jesus helps us to enter his shem, or vibration, which, as I’ve said, is the vibration of love itself.  Love is, after all, the true path upon which we are to embark in co-creating and re-creating our worlds. We hereby set our direction and our intention and open our hearts to receive the sacred energy from Father God and the substantive provision from Mother God’s Queendom we will need to create and re-create our worlds. We do this in the name — the vibration, the shem — of the Creator,  as in the phrase “Hallowed be thy name.” Holy – and wholly encompassing of the All – is the vibration of the Creator of all things in the Universe.

Now, although the Aramaic words cannot really be translated literally, the vibration of the words of this prayer have a certain and specific quality that stirs a corresponding resonance in the “void” of the undifferentiated strata of creative dust out of which all forms are made. The following is one possible “translation” of this Aramaic prayer of Jesus offered by Sufi murshid  (senior scholar) Neil Douglas-Klotzl, from which I personally leaned to articulate the Aramaic words of this prayer.  I will give the Aramaic words followed by his translation. For a vocal rendition of this prayer, see the video on my December 26th , 2016 post.

Abwoon d’bwashmaya – O Breathing Life (or Father-Mother God)

Nethqadash shmakh – your Name (vibration) shines everywhere!

Teytey malkuthakh – Release a space to plant your Presence here. (Or: Let thy Queendom come now! is another possible translation).

Nehwey sebyanach aykanna – Envision your “I Can” now.

d’bwashmaya aph b’arah – Embody your desire in every light and form.

Hawvlan lachma d’sunqanan yaomana. – Grow through me this moment’s bread and wisdom.

Washboqlan khaubayn (wakhtahayn) aykana daph khnan shbwoqan I’khayyabayn.

Untie the knots of failure binding me, as I release the strands I hold of others’ faults.

Wela tahlan l’ nesyuna Ela patzan min bisha. – Help me to not forget my Source, yet free me from not being in the Present.

Metol dilakhie malkutha, wahayla, wateshbukhta l’ ahlam almin. – From you arises every vision, power, and song, from gathering to gathering.

Ameyn. – Amen: may my future actions grow from here!

There are a few other possible translations of the Aramaic Prayer of Jesus, which one can find on the WEB. They all essentially convey the same intention.

What opened my understanding and piqued my interest in this prayer is the expressed purpose for vocalizing it. In this prayer, as I said earlier, we have two invocations: one to Father God and another to Mother God. The invocation to Father God is to bring into one’s creative space the vibration of Creative Power. The invocation to Mother God is to bring into one’s creative space from out of her cornucopia, her “horn of plenty,” the provision needed to give form to one’s creative Word.

But the magic of this prayer is to be known as one takes the position of praying as God rather than to God; in other words, as a co-creator with Father/Mother God, rather than petitioning God to give me something I need in my life, something we are told by the Teacher that our Father in Heaven already knows. We pray our needs into existence rather than asking God to fill our needs for us. We do this in love but also as Love speaking the command “Let it be according to my Word.”

In Biblical words, we may say “Behold I create” – and I take full responsibility for my creation – starting with the most immediate creation and world of my physical body and temple — staying with it for as long as it exists and the substance that gave it form totally disintegrates and returns to the undifferentiated substance of creation – my world, my creation, my responsibility.

The rest of the prayer embodies and articulates a process of clearing one’s slate, so-to-speak, of all past experiences, both the good and the bad, the successes and the failures, one’s virtuous deeds along with one’s “sins” of the past, especially those “trespasses” that one has made upon others’ space, but also those that others have made upon one’s own space. “Untie the knots that bind me,” to others by reason of my judgments of them, and vice versa that bind others to me by their judgments of me. In other words, I release all things that may hold me back from pursuing my dreams and current creative imaginings. Then it ends with the command, “Let my future actions grow from here.” Or, in the words of Captain Picard, “Make it so!”

One can learn to articulate the Aramaic Prayer of Jesus is just a few weeks with the help of Neil Douglas-Klotz’s audio cassette tapes available from SoundsTrue.com. I learned it and could say it from memory in just two months and it stays fresh in my memory for instant recall. The Aramaic words seemed like deja vu to my tongue. I highly recommend it to my friends and blog followers.

The Lord’s Prayer

Here is a more timely version of The Lord’s Prayer, perhaps more current with the times and with the spiritual awakening underway in human consciousness. It was penned by Lord Martin Exeter, a British lord from the United Kingdom — who was also my spiritual mentor for some twenty years.

I am in heaven. The revelation of myself is holy. My kingdom comes because I am here. My will is done in earth because my will is done in heaven.  I give the bread of life in each moment of my living on earth.

I forgive, and that forgiveness is received by those who share the spirit of forgiveness. I lead no one into tribulation, but deliver all evil into the creative cycle.

For mine is the kingdom present on earth because I am present on earth. Mine is the creative power of the Word. And mine is the glory which results, shining round about, to be reflected by the world which I create.

So, with that I will say Adieu and, until my next post,

Be love. Be loved.

Anthony

Read my Health Light Newsletter online at LiftingTones.com.

 

 

 

 

 

“Jars of spring water are not enough anymore. Take us down to the river.” –Rumi

I will conclude this series of considerations of the Jesus of faith versus the Jesus of history with Michael Baigent’s own words summarizing the journey we have taken through his provocative book The Jesus Papers — Exposing the Greatest Cover-Up in History, words and thoughts that I fully embrace as resonant with my own spirit of understanding of the life and ministry of Jesus.

Here are Baigent’s final words from his book:

DURING THE COURSE of writing this book, I have sought out knowledge of a very special context – that of Egypt and Judaea in the first century of the modern era, a period about which there are few facts that we can be certain of. We have seen how the context can be controlled and forced to support a story that simply can’t be true. The Jesus of history cannot have been as the theology of the Jesus of faith presents him.

During the course of our journey, we have discovered that Jesus rejected the political activity of his Zealot supporters. This is a crucially important piece of information that has been missed. We have seen too that there is no evidence that he died on the cross; in fact, what evidence survives suggests otherwise. And if he didn’t die on the cross, where does that leave the resurrection? His divinity? His equal­ity in the Holy Trinity? These claims all disintegrate once the spin stops.

We have discovered that all these assertions about Jesus came much later, the result of a glossy gift-wrapping of some historical events that were deliberately distorted in order to serve a strict theo­logical agenda, one that maintains to the present day a number of ex­tremely odd and eccentric notions. Foremost among these is the belief that only men were Christ’s closest disciples and so women cannot serve as priests, bishops, or popes. With this discovery, the male domination of the apostolic succession crumbles away, along with the Rome-centered concept of the succession itself.

And crucially, we have also discovered that there is no evidence to suggest that Jesus intended to be worshiped as a god. On the con­trary, his teachings indicate that he wanted each person to have the opportunity to travel to the Far-World to find the Divine for himself or herself — or as he put it, to travel to the kingdom of heaven and be filled with the “Spirit of God.”

Where did Jesus learn all this? Not in Galilee, we have concluded, but much more likely in Egypt, where the Jewish community appears to have been more diverse than the Jewish community in Palestine and to have nurtured a more mystical approach to religion.

Furthermore, nothing in our findings suggests that Jesus ever planned to start a religion, let alone encourage others to write down his words and organize them into an official collection of sayings. In fact, quite the reverse is more likely I suspect that he wouldn’t have minded at all if people forgot him; what was more important to him was that people should not forget the way to the kingdom of heaven, a notion not restricted to Christianity and Judaism: “To be ignorant of the divine is the ultimate vice,” proclaim the texts attributed to the Egyptian sage Hermes Trismegistus.

It should be clear now that history is malleable: we have our facts, but we never have enough of them to be able to put our hands on our hearts and say, in all honesty, that we know for certain what hap­pened. All history is a myth, a story created to make some sense out of the few events we can know. The past is a hypothesis erected to ex­plain and justify the present.

In some ways this does not matter, for myths exist to communicate meaning, not history. But in this scientific age we want to know that the myths we live by are, if not true, at least based upon some approximation of the truth. We want to know that Jesus was really crucified, that Caesar was truly murdered by Brutus, that Paul did have a mystical experience on his way to Damascus. All these events are plausible, and there is no intrinsic reason why they might not be true.

But what do we do with beliefs such as Jesus walking on water?  Jesus having been raised from the dead? Peter founding the Roman Church with infallible popes? None of these beliefs is plausible, and there is no intrinsic reason why any of them should be true. Yet there are many who equally believe both sets of assertions.

Our modern world is dominated by the “religions of the book”­ Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. We can see that to base truth upon a written word makes it vulnerable to all the problems of interpreta­tion and translation, to say nothing of religious distortion. The danger is that books foster a dependence upon belief rather than knowledge; if there has been one underlying theme of our journey, it has been that we need to travel the road for ourselves and experience its hardships, pleasures, and insights directly rather than secondhand or vicariously. (Bold emphasis mine)

And with that plea I must bring our journey to an end, not be­cause there is no further to travel, for of course there is, but because we have traveled much already and it is now time to pause and reflect on just how far we have come.

As we halt, it only remains to quote the great Persian Sufi Jelalud­din Rumi, who, cutting straight to the heart of the matter, as was al­ways his way, cried out to all who would listen: “Jars of spring water are not enough anymore. Take us down to the river!'”

To drink from the river is our birthright. Let no one deny us that freedom!

There is no argument that the impact upon the entire world of humankind that the presence and ministry of this one man made is nothing short of a profound transformation and elevation of the human spirit and of human consciousness. I know this is true for me personally. Just to think of him and to read his words in my red-letter Bible stirs my soul and quickens my spirit. Jesus is alive today in the heart of humanity as truly as he was alive and physically present on earth two-thousand years ago.

I’ll leave you with this five-minute video clip by Dr. Bruce Lipton on how our beliefs direct our lives 95% of the time and how religious beliefs are programs and not reality. Believing in God is not the same as knowing God. To know God is to go beyond belief and to know your Self. That is the only reality we can know for certain: that I AM.

In my next post I will consider the Aramaic Prayer of Jesus and the direct access to Father and Mother God available to all human beings on Earth. Until then,

Be love. Be loved.

Anthony

Read my HealthLight Newsletter online at LiftingTones.com.  Current post: Humble Honey Kills Bacteria.

 

Good morning and Happy Easter!

I feel the burgeoning wave of joy and happiness that is resurrected from the womb of human hearts every year at Easter in the wake of the fasting season of Lent and just on the heels of passion Holy Week and sorrowful Good Friday — at least in the Christian sector of the world’s seven-plus billion population. With spring bursting out all over, this is a most appropriate time of the year to celebrate Easter.

(click on the picture to enlarge it)

A study in 2012 estimated Christianity was the largest faith at 2.2 billion adherents or 31.5 percent of the world’s population. The Roman Catholic Church makes up 50 percent of that total, with Protestants — including Anglicans and non-denominational churches — at 37 percent and Orthodox at 12 percent.”  So, nearly a third of the people on earth celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus. Little wonder the day is so bright, even as bright as the Sun rising in the East. 

Hmm. I must look up the origin of the word “Easter.” And I did. Here is one item that stands out among all of the hoopla over the pagan roots of this annual Christian celebration:

Because the English Anglo/Saxon language originally derived from the Germanic, there are many similarities between German and English. Many English writers have referred to the German language as the “Mother Tongue!” The English word Easter is of German/Saxon origin and not Babylonian as Alexander Hislop falsely claimed. The German equivalent is OsterOster (Ostern being the modern day equivalent) is related to Ostwhich means the rising of the sun, or simply in English, eastOster comes from the old Teutonic form of auferstehen / auferstehung, which means resurrection, which in the older Teutonic form comes from two words, Ester meaning first, and stehen meaning to stand. These two words combine to form erstehen which is an old German form of auferstehen, the modern day German word for resurrection.

It was the Emperor Constantine at the Council of Nicea in A.D. 325 who “ordained that Easter shouldn’t be connected with the festival of another faith. It should stand on its own in connection with the natural world. Hence he ordained that Easter should be celebrated on the Sunday after the first  new moon of Spring.” (David Potter of Oxford University Press.)  So, Easter Sunday’s final resting place is somewhere between March 21 and April 25. The date of Easter Day is usually the first Sunday after the first Full Moon occurring on or after the March equinox.

An issue was also settled at this council concerning the celebration of the Passover by the Jewish Christians, as Jesus’ crucifixion was said to be associated with the Passover. Obviously, Christianity emerged out of Judaism. Thus the consolidation of the two celebrations by Constantine.

Now the Easter egg can be traced back to practices in pre-dynastic Egypt as well as amid the early Christians of Mesopotamia.  From there it spread into Russia and Siberia through the Orthodox Churches. In Christianity, for the celebration of Easter, the Easter egg symbolizes the empty tomb of Jesus. An ancient tradition was the staining of the Easter egg with the color red in memory of the blood of Christ shed during his crucifixion. The egg is also a symbol of fertility.

Significance of the Resurrection

I will now return to my consideration of the Foreword of Stevan Davies’ book The Gospel of Thomas – Annotated & Explained, written by the his Series Editor Andrew Harvey. I will continue from where I left off in my post of April 7th on the theme of “Kingdom-consciousness.”

If all the Gospel of Thomas did was relentlessly and sublimely cham­pion the path to our transfiguration and point out its necessity, it would be one of the most important of all religious writings — but it does even more. In saying 22, the Gospel of Thomas gives us a brilliantly concise and pre­cise “map” of the various stages of transformation that have to be unfolded in the seeker for the “secret” to be real in her being and active though all her powers. Like saying 13, saying 22 has no precedent in the synoptic gospels and is, I believe, the single most important document of the spiritual life that Jesus has left us.

Jesus saw infants being suckled. He said to his disciples: These infants taking milk are like those who enter the Kingdom. His disciples asked him: If we are infants will we enter the Kingdom? Jesus responded: When you make the two into one, and when you make the inside like the outside and the outside like the inside, and the upper like the lower and the lower like the upper, and thus make the male and the female the same, so that the male isn’t male and the female isn’t female. When you make an eye to replace an eye, and a hand to replace a hand, and a foot to replace a foot, and an image to replace an image, then you will enter the Kingdom.

When Jesus says in saying 19 “If you become my disciples and listen to me, these stones will serve you,” in saying 24 “There is light within a man of light, and he lights up all of the world,” and in saying 106 “When you make the two into one, you will be called sons of men. When you say ‘Move, mountain!’ it will move,” he was not speaking in incandescent poetry; he was describing the actual powers that God gives those who risk becoming divinized, powers that can alter natural law and “burn down the house” of the oppressive power structures of the world.

Fourth and finally, we see in saying 22 the final cryptic sentences of the saying: “When you make an eye to replace an eye, and a hand to replace a hand, and a foot to replace a foot, and an image to replace an image, then you will enter the Kingdom.” What these lines describe is nothing less than the physical transformation that mystical union makes possible, the bringing up of ordinary matter into the living truth of the Light.

The ultimate sign of the Christ is the victory of the Resurrection, which is the marriage of matter and spirit to create a wholly new and eternal substance. Those mystics who follow Christ into union come to know and taste the glory of the Resurrected Body in their own bodies. The pow­ers available to the human being willing to undertake the full rigor of the Jesus-transformation are limitless. What could not be done to trans­form this world by a group of seekers who allowed their whole beings­–psychological, spiritual, and physical–to become increasingly transfigured by the living light?

The greatest of all modern philosophers–Sri Aurobindo — saw that only an “integral” transformation could provide the force and inspiration to change that must occur if humanity is to survive and evolve. Jesus in saying 22 has anticipated Sri Aurobindo’s vision and provided the map to its realization.

There may be very little time left to take the adventure into total being that the Gospel of Thomas advocates with such astringent brilliance and pre­cision. In such a terrible age as ours, it is easy to believe that the dark powers, the powers of that corpse of the world that the Jesus of Thomas so fiercely denounces, have won already, and there is nothing even the most passionate of us can do to turn around a humanity addicted to violence and destruction.

Despair, however, is the last illusion. The Gospel of Thomas and the Jesus who gave it to us continue to challenge us to dare to become one with the Divine and start living the revolutionary life that streams from union and that can transform all things. This worst of times needs the clearest and most unflinchingly exigent of visions to counteract and trans­form it; in Jesus’ words in the Gospel of Thomas and in his living out of their reality through and beyond death itself into the eternal empowering glory of the Resurrection, we have the permanent sign of the Way, the Truth, and the all-transforming Life that, even now, can build here on earth the reality of God’s Kingdom.

As this series  The “Jesus of Faith” Vs the “Jesus of History” winds down, I will return to my desk to write, edit and publish my final post of the series. Until then, I wish you each one a Happy Easter and offer my thanks to you for sharing these considerations with me over the past several weeks.  Until my next post, then,

Be love. Be loved.

Anthony

Photo credit: Craig Burrows “The Invisible Light that Flowers Emit”   Click on the link to see more of Craig’s flowers.

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