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“The Hero’s Journey,” part 2 — The Quest

My Chorale PicThe “Quest” is ultimately for the “Elixir of Immortality,” says Joseph Campbell in The Hero with a Thousand Faces. Every quest is based upon our individual and collective subconscious memories of a heavenly state where life is peaceful, harmonious and, the best part, immortal. No one dies in heaven. No one even gets sick or suffers in heaven. No one is poor or hungry or has to pay rent in heaven. No one is lonely or depressed or even sad. Sounds like the kind of place anyone would want to live. Well, we all did at one time. 

Heaven is from whence we came and to which we long to return — and shall. Yes, even though we fight, strive and pay big bucks to the medical establishments and health food stores to stave off the inevitable end of our quest, we long for heaven.  We just don’t wanna die to get there. Hmm. Maybe we don’t have to.

Heaven is said to be right here now. We just need to turn around  and see it, as The Teacher instructed.  He was in heaven standing on the ground when he said “I go to prepare a place for you, so that where I am ye may be also.”  He didn’t say where I will be after I ascend, but “where I am” now. He was enjoying a state of consciousness that allowed him to be in heaven on earth right in the midst of a very troubled world.  

As the “Hero” of “The Greatest Story Ever Told,” Jesus completed his quest for the Elixir of Immortality.  He set out to restore conscious divine Presence in human flesh on earth, met and defeated the nemesis of the satanic human ego that had been hiding the Elixir of Immortality behind “the letter of the law” that kills any spiritual life in believers, then took the sting out of death itself by entering the kingdom of heaven without dying. He had completed the work he had come on earth to do well before his victorious ordeal with death. “Father . . . I have glorified thee on the earth: I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do.” (17 John). He didn’t come here to “die for our sins,” as St. Paul’s Christianity teaches. He came here to show us how to live and therein glorify God. Then he said, in effect, “Now, you do it.  You be the hero of your life story. Turn around and enter the kingdom of heaven that’s within you exactly where you are here and now.”    

Actually, heaven is everywhere there’s consciousness – and that’s everywhere.  Our experience of heaven depends upon our own conscious awareness of being in heaven and living out of that awareness. There is no place where heaven isn’t. Even “hell” is in heaven.  That’s what makes it a hell: living in heaven on earth but not being aware of it and bumping into its laws and principles that would otherwise bring about a heavenly experience—like being forgiving, loving and kind instead of resenting, feeling sorry for ourselves, getting even and being rude toward one another; like giving instead of getting, and giving each other space to be ourselves instead of judging and killing one another with words, guns and bombs. We can let heaven be our experience now simply by loving ourselves and one another as ourselves. 

But, enough with the preaching. It’s really passion. I hunger and thirst for these things to become reality on Earth. And that’s what it will take on all our parts for the world to be transformed into the kingdom of heaven on Earth — the “Golden Age” that is waiting to be born through us — a deep hungering and thirsting on the part of humanity — as we were taught by The Teacher in his sermon on the mount: “Blessed are they that do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be satisfied.” Heaven here and now is a quest worth hungering and thirsting after. 

Let’s look at some of the historical records that David Wilcock painstakingly researched and collected together in his captivating book THE SYNCHRONICITY KEY. I’m just finishing my second time through this fascinating and remarkable literary achievement. Let’s start with the Book of Daniel from the Old Testament of the Bible. Wilcock suggests that the book itself tells the story of “The Hero’s Journey.”


Daniel was the prophet who not only interpreted King Nebuchadnezzar’s dream, but told him the dream itself, which the king had been so distressed over that he couldn’t even recall it. In this dream the king had beheld a great statue — “its brilliance extraordinary . . . its appearance was frightening.” The statue had a very telling composition, made as it was of various elements that bore significant signs of the times, both then and now as well as future. Its head was made of gold, its chest and arms of silver, its mid section and thighs of bronze, its legs of iron, and its feet of a mixture of iron and potters clay. Then a stone, not made by human hands, struck the statue on its feet made of iron and clay and broke them into pieces, bringing the entire statue down to the ground where it shattered into such fine pieces that the wind carried the dust away like chaff so that not a trace of it could be found. But the stone that struck the feet of the statue “became a great mountain and filled the whole earth.” You can read the story yourself in chapter five of his book. A very profound story whose time of fulfillment may well have come.  For this part, I will borrow from Wilcock’s own insightful words, also giving you a sampling of his amazingly clear thought processes, much like Edgar Cayce, of whom David Wilcock is quite possibly a reincarnation.  I love where he goes with this story, one of my most favorite Biblical stories.

We clearly see an enormous statue of a man–the hero character in our story–built in layers of gold, silver, bronze and iron. Each of these layers ends up being smashed, one by one. Notice that the resulting rubble was said to look like the “chaff of the summer threshing floors.” Chaff is the unusable material that falls out of a mill that is used for grinding–or threshing–grain. The grain mill is one of the most common symbolic codes embedded in dozens of different myths, worldwide, to symbolize the 25,920-year precession of the equinoxes, according to de Santillana and von Dechend. The central axis of the mill symbolizes the earth’s axis as it drifts through the precession in de Santillana and von Dechend’s epic model. Each section of the statue corresponds to an age. The Golden Age is represented by the head-which is the beginning of each new cycle. In the final age, everything from the previous cycles is smashed by the stone in Nebuchadnezzar’s vision-and comes to a rather abrupt end.

Daniel clearly interprets each of the four main sections of the statue–gold, silver, bronze, and iron–as corresponding to a major cycle or age of human history. This begins with the Golden Age, represented here by the king. However, this vision seems to be far less relevant to Nebuchadnezzar than he may have wanted to believe at the time.

“You, 0 king, the king of kings–to whom the God of heaven has given the kingdom, the power, the might, and the glory, into whose hand he has given human beings, wherever they live, the wild animals of the field, and the birds of the air, and whom he has established as ruler over them all–you are the head of gold. After you shall arise another kingdom inferior to yours, and yet a third kingdom of bronze, which shall rule over the whole earth. And there shall be a fourth kingdom, strong as iron. Just as iron crushes and smashes everything, it shall crush and shatter all these.”

We are clearly going through the Iron Age now. Indeed, many traditional cultures have been crushed and shattered by the introduction of machines and technology. Many of these machines are made out of metal, which is signified by the iron. As we continue reading this prophecy, we find out that the people of this age are weakened by how divided they become. Nonetheless, a core of strength remains: “As you saw the feet and toes partly of potter’s clay and partly of iron, it shall be a divided kingdom; but some of the strength of iron shall be in it, as you saw the iron mixed with the clay … the kingdom shall be partly strong and partly brittle.”

Feet are the symbol of understanding, both figuratively and literally. We stand on our feet. Human understanding of the laws and principles that govern the universe has been limited, to say the least, and is undergoing a download and upgrade.  Some of us are open to the download and some of us are closed to anything that disturbs the status quo. So there is currently a mixture of new and old in human understanding and the two do not bond together, just like clay and iron do not bond.  

The degree to which this Iron Age is a prophecy of our modern world becomes clearer when we skip ahead to 7:23: “There shall be a fourth kingdom on earth that shall be different from all the other kingdoms; it shall devour the whole earth, and trample it down, and break it to pieces.”

Once this Iron Age comes to a close, we again return to the Golden Age. This description is given in symbolic, dreamlike terms: And in the days of those [Iron Age] kings, the God of heaven will set up a kingdom that shall never be destroyed, nor shall this kingdom be left to another people. It shall crush all these kingdoms and bring them to an end, and it shall stand forever.

Moving ahead to 12:1, we again get a clear prophecy of the difficult times were in now, but also a revealing glimpse of what the Golden Age might be like once it finally arrives: There shall be a time of anguish,
such as has never occurred since nations first came into existence. But at that time
your people shall be delivered; everyone who is found writtenin the book.”

Some may believe those in the bookwill only be the Chosen,” whomever they think those people may be. Lets consider that the bookmight actually be the story of the Heros Journey itself . If this is the symbol that is being used, then how do we write ourselves into the book? How do we join the great story? It could be that everyone who takes up their own quest for the ancient Elixir of Immortality finds themselves in
the book
. Everyone who is willing to face the nemesis in the quest for a better, stronger and more loving world has dedicated themselves to the planetary healing process we now must go through. Once we defeat the nemesis on a global level, we access the treasure it has been guarding–and can now enter the Golden Age. Daniel’s description of the Golden Age is very interesting: “Many of those who sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake; some to everlasting life, and some to shame and everlasting contempt. Those who are wise shall shine like the brightness of the skyand those who lead many to righteousness, like the starsforever and ever.”

This appears to be an undeniable reference to the same fourthdensity shiftthat is described in the Law of One series. The next stage of human evolution, when we free ourselves from the cycles of birth and death through reincarnation, does seem to involve a movement into a light body”–much like Jehoshua [Jesus] appeared after the resurrection. In chapter 21 we will discover there are more than I60,000 documented cases of Rainbow Body occurring in Tibet and China alone. This same passage also refers to “those who sleep in the dust of the earthand then awaken. This is clearly metaphorical, not literal. It is very likely a reference to people who have remained unaware of the spiritual principles that govern the universe, rather than to dead bodies rising out of the ground, as many Christian fundamentalists believe. (Wilcock)

I will leave it there for now. I will continue in my next post, which will reveal the encoded timeline for the Golden Age’s appearance and address the nature of the nemesis. Until then, 

Be love. Be loved.


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The “Hero’s Journey,” part 1: The Story

My Chorale Pic


I am into my second reading of David Wilcock’s timely book, “THE SYNCHRONICITY KEYThe Hidden Intelligence Guiding the Universe and You.” Chapter nine has captivated my curiosity about how novels and scripts for movies are written. So I thought it would be fun, even insightful, to blog on the topic, which is actually quite fascinating.  I’ll just jump right into the middle of the chapter. But first a little background might be helpful.

The phrase “The Hero’s Journey” was coined by Joseph Campbell in his comparative mythology study, which he published in 1949 in the form of his world classic scholarly work The Hero with a Thousand Faces. In it Campbell explores and analyses myths from all over the world, in all different time periods, and finds that they have remarkable similarities to one another. He calls the overall story “The Hero’s Journey.” Wilcock describes the journey:

It’s how we work through our fears, our weaknesses, our limitations—each and every day. It is ultimately the blueprint of our evolution—and the path to a Golden Age. Anyone who writes an engaging, believable screenplay is tapping into the Hero’s Journey story structure, whether they realize it or not. Those who are aware of it have a much better chance of success. . . . Campbell drew heavily on the legendary work of Dr. Carl Jung, who found that these various ancient myths keep repeating in our dreams with certain ongoing themes he called archetypes. 

And that’s a whole other topic which I may explore at a latter date.  But for now . . .


Every successful Hollywood movie story line follows what is well known by all play-wrights – who want their stories to find favor with their intended audiences – as “the structure.” The structure unravels the story between three acts: beginning, middle and ending. The basic “structure” was first spelled out by Aristotle.  The theme of the structure is the telling and retelling of the story of “The Hero’s Journey,” and it is divided into four parts: 1) The hero’s quest, 2) The hero’s initiation in the quest, 3) Facing and defeating the nemesis, which typically leads to the “dark night of the soul” when all is lost, and 4) The final showdown and triumph over the nemesis, and the seizing of the “Elixir of Immortality,” the prize and goal sought in the hero’s quest.

At least this is how movies with happy endings usually go.  There are some “dark” movies where the hero is defeated by the nemesis and often dies. An outstanding example is the bloody comedy “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street”— which we watched last night as a live performance by the New York Philharmonic from Lincoln Center of Stephen Sondheim’s musical masterpiece staring Emma Thompson and Bryn Terfel. The movie version features Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham Carter in the leading roles.  

The setting is 1831 London and the story is about a skilled barber and alleged serial killer named Benjamin Barker who is falsely charged and sentenced to penal transportation from London by the corrupt Judge Turpin.  Judge Turpin seizes Barker’s wife Lucy  for himself and rapes her.  Lucy, who is said to have poisoned herself, shows up in the drama as an old beggar woman. Judge Turpin takes their daughter, Johanna, as his ward and raises her as his own.  

Fifteen years later, Barker returns to London under the alias Sweeney Todd, sets up a barber shop above a meat-pie shop on Fleet Street owned and operated by Mrs. Nellie Lovett. The two concoct a sordid business in which Sweeney Todd murders his customers in a twisted mission to rid the world of useless human beings and drops their corpses down into Mrs. Lovett’s shop, who then processes them into meat pies. His primary quest focuses on avenging himself against Judge Turpin by luring him into his shop for a “shave.” His second goal is to get his daughter back.  

As the complex plot unravels and thickens, Sweeney Todd does finally have his opportunity to avenge himself by slitting Judge Turpin’s throat in a bloody scene in his barber shop upon his fancy new barber’s chair.  So, our hero does achieve his quest. However, the story takes a dark twist and turn when Sweeney Todd realizes he has also slain his “beautiful” Lucy, after the old beggar woman (Lucy) recognizes his familiar face.  Fearing she might blow his cover and announce his return to the village, Sweeney Todd slits her throat as well not knowing it is his Lucy he has slain.  Studying her face more closely and realizing his horrible mistaken deed, he presents his own throat to Nellie Lovett’s meat pie shop-boy, who has by now discovered the dastardly business at which he has been employed. 

In the grand and gory finale, the boy takes Sweeney’s silver razor in hand and ends the demon barber’s ill-intended quest and miserable life.  The hero is defeated by his own nemesis and, of course, fails to achieve the “elixir of immortality.”

(Although the story itself — which may have some basis in legend*– is now immortalized by Stephen Sondheim. Just as a side note, I am intrigued by, and somewhat concerned about, what archetypes in my own heredity makeup find this movie entertaining. And that goes for all movies and novels I seem to enjoy. Hmm.) 


The lighter movies typically have a sweet ending where the hero triumphs and wins the prize at the end, usually in the form of riding off into the sunset with the beautiful woman, for whom he had to slay a dragon–usually the nemesis of the shadow of his own character flaw, often reflected back to him in the “bad guy” who stands in the way of achieving his quest.  The hero’s nemesis is often mirrored by the villain in movies and novels. 

The hero, of course, is sometimes a woman, as in “Gone With the Wind” — celebrating its 75th anniversary today. This movie is somewhat complex, however, having both failure and victory in the story line. Whereas Rhett Butler (Clark Gable) fails in his quest to tame Scarlett O’Hara (Vivien Leigh) for himself, Scarlet emerges as the hero of the story who has to face her own nemesis: her self-centered, spoiled female ego. Her quest is to find her man, whom she singles out in Ashley Wilkes (Leslie Howard), who marries Melanie Hamilton (Olivia de Havilland), a generous and kind woman with a compassionate and understanding heart.  When that quest proves unobtainable, Scarlett turns her quest toward her beloved plantation home Tara.

Act I: In her futile struggle  with her nemesis, Scarlet  loses everything as Tara is pillaged by the Civil War and her father dies in a fall from his horse while pursuing a thieving renegade, leaving her with nothing but the land and in a pitiful state of having to scrounge for food and tax money to keep Kara from falling into the hands of the carpetbaggers.  Scarlet has her dark night of the soul, swearing to heaven above that she “will never be hungry again!”  (Intermission)

Act II: During her dark-night-of-the-soul experience, Scarlet remembers what her father had taught her about the land being the most valuable thing in life to possess and cherish. The land, then, on which Scarlet’s beloved Tara sits—restored  to its former elegance with wealth she acquired by marrying Mr. Kennedy right from under of her sister’s nose—becomes a substitute elixir of immortality our hero literally and selfishly seizes in the second act of the movie. The genuine elixir that would fulfill her soul’s quest is the freedom to be her real Self in the wake of the demise of her nemesis, her false human ego.

Act III: Scarlet and Rhett, deserving one another, finally tie the knot and bring a daughter, Bonnie, into their lives, whom her father spoils and treats like a princess, buying her a pony as a final measure of his love and devotion, much against her mother’s wishes.  In the end, Rhett is driven away from Scarlet after they lose Bonnie, who falls off her pony in the shadow of her grandfather’s fateful end, a tragedy Scarlet feared would happen and for which she severely blamed Rhett. This final blow led to their alienation and ultimate and dramatic separation from one another.  Rhett returns to Scarlett, as he frequently does throughout the movie, only to be finally convinced of her incorrigibility.

Grand Finale: Neither of our would-be heroes defeat their nemesis, however, which is mirrored back to them each by the other. This failure turns this world-classic into a modern-day tragedy with Rhett closing the front door of Tara in Scarlet’s face, not giving “a damn” what she does with her miserable life, and Scarlet remains unredeemed from and defeated by her nemesis. Rather than facing her dilemma with Rhett – whom she realizes she has come to truly love – and letting her self-centered ego take a back seat to what had become really important to her, she chooses the path of least resistance by putting off the would-be victory with the classic line “There’s always tomorrow,” a sad but realistic ending for a much loved movie – which in itself makes a statement about the human drama.

 All of it is the complex and sometimes frustrating story of the hero’s journey, a story we all apparently love and live to hear told over and over again in movies and novels, and for one reason only: it is the story of our very own lives.  Even larger than that, it is the story of a nation, a people, and the evolution of the human race itself – all of which we will explore in this series.  

The questions I would pose, then, and leave you to ponder, are: With whom do you most identify in the two stories I’ve cited? Do you see your own hero’s journey playing out?  And where are you in your journey? Let’s take each act and part of the hero’s journey and explore where we are in it, as individuals, as a nation, and as a collective body of humanity.

We’ll start with THE QUEST in my next post .  This will give you time to mull over these stories and reflect on your own hero’s journey.  Until then,

Be love. Be loved.


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* The original story of Sweeney Todd was quite possibly based on an older urban legend that found its way into Charles Dickens’ Pickwick Papers (1836–37).  Dickens tells how “the servant Sam Weller says that a pieman used cats ‘for beefsteak, veal and kidney, ‘cording to the deman’, and recommends that people should buy pies only ‘when you know the lady that made it, and is quite sure it ain’t kitten.’” (Wikipedia )


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