Creating the New Earth Together

Posts tagged ‘Transmutation of the body’

Crucibles for Transmutation and Ascension, page 2: The Body Temple

“Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion . . . over all the earth.” (Genesis 1:26) 

Continuing to do what is mine to do amid the pivotal turbulence in the world—and joining my many friends and colleagues who are holding a space of love and right expectancy for a creative resolution to the current crises playing out—I invite you to join me in exploring how the biblical temples of old reflect the design inherent in our physical bodies, temples inhabited by angels for the presence of God on Earth.  Let us not forget who we are and what our purpose is for being here at this crucial time of purification of the body of mankind by the fire of Love.  These are end-time days for this mind-made world. There is no way forward for it, nor for those who are trapped in its deceitful ways. A passage from the last chapter of the Book of Revelation comes to mind:

“He that is unjust, let him be unjust still; and he which is filthy, let him be filthy still; and he that is righteous, let him be righteous still; and he that is holy let him be holy still.” 

Holiness is an attribute of angels to whom the human body is sacred. I delight in sharing excerpt from my book, SACRED ANATOMY, which I wrote during the latter part of the previous century and published in the new millennial year of 2005, subtitled Where spirit and flesh dance in the fire of creation.  I will simply begin our journey in the first chapter of the book.

PART I: THE BODY TEMPLE

“The physical body is Real and beautiful beyond words to describe. It is wonderful beyond all the imaginings of mankind. In it are revealed the secret things of God.  Through it work the Cosmic Forces of the Universe.”  Lloyd A. Meeker (Uranda)

Temple of Flesh.

“Deck thyself now with majesty and excellence”

These words from the Book of Job are both an invitation and a command to be beautiful, upright and glorious in my spirit as well as in my physical form.  Indeed, why would not the temple of the Living God on Earth be decked with majesty and excellence and arrayed with glory and beauty?   Is it not the very House of God in living, breathing, singing flesh?  Did we not deck it with majesty and excellence, beauty and glory from the beginning, when we said,  “Let us make Man in our image, after our own likeness, ” and when the morning stars sang together and the sons and daughters of God shouted for joy?

 Where is our glory now?  How have we paled in majesty and excellence, we who are  God incarnate?  What has become of our flesh, our sacred temples?  Are they merely dust returning unto dust or are they mud lifted up unto splendor?  What do you see when you look at your body? A heap of troublesome flesh or a vibrating, scintillating domicile for divinity?  And who is it that is looking?  The one who needs a body to exist at all, but for a short time, or the One who made this temple in the womb and lives forevermore with or without it?

Look again and see with deeper eyes, with the eyes of the immortal being you are.  What do you see now?  Can you see a dwelling place for your own divine presence as a creator being, a beautiful temple of flesh and bone?  Perhaps I can help us see more than meets the physical eyes.  Let me lend my spiritual eyes for the duration of this book so we can see all that is with us in the sacred anatomy of our physical bodies.

Whether we know it or not, believe it or not, feel it or not, our bodies are temples more splendid than the Gothic cathedrals of Europe and more ornate than the gold-plated mosques of Arabia.  Those temples were raised to appease and worship imaginary gods in far distant heavens. These temples are raised to the living God by angels who descend from out of the realms of light to bring glory to the farthest reaches of creation so that God can dwell with us now in the flesh. Temples of yore were raised to the gods with altars for sacrifice and atonement.  The human temple had become a place of desolation and violence.  Man had lost consciousness of the presence of the divine within himself and so built structures, beautiful structures, to the gods of old and, more recently, to the One God, worshiped today by seventy-two different names throughout the religions of the world.

King Solomon’s temple in Jerusalem was arrayed with much glory and beauty.  Yet when the Master  Jesus ministered in that part of the world he is recorded to have declared that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed as a single lily of the field.  How much more, he assured us, are we so adorned by our Father in heaven. He was referring to the human being, the design and beauty of which even Solomon’s temple merely reflected.

There are remarkable similarities between these two temples, the one of wood, stone and gold and the one of bone, flesh and spirit.  Solomon’s temple was built according to a very specific design for the purpose of providing a glorious and protective surround for the presence of God.  Built as a permanent resting place for the tabernacle of old, which Moses had made to transport the Ark of the Covenant through the wilderness after the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt, it was constructed mostly out of fir and cedar—the famed and magnificent cedars of Lebanon the Phoenicians used to build their great ships—along with hand-hewed stone for the floor of the inner court.  The entire “House of the Lord” was said to be overlaid with pure gold, just as the Ark of the Covenant had been.

 Similarly, our body temples are constructed with bones—fibrous tissues like unto wooden beams—which are overlaid with connecting tissues of tendons, ligaments and muscles to hold them together and give them flexibility for movement.   The entire structure is imbued and overlaid with the pure essences of love, the spirit of God that gives it breath and moves it about.

Moses’ tabernacle, which served as a portable tent (the literal meaning of the word tabernacle) for the Ark of the Covenant, was divided into three chambers, one at the inner most center and the other two encircling it, each chamber serving a specific function.  The outer court was an entrance and gathering chamber.  It separated the tabernacle from the encampment of the twelve tribes of Israel, where they conducted commerce and the affairs of everyday life.  There was a gate for entering and going forth; in this sense, what separated also connected.

The outer court was the site of activities relating to the mental level—the teaching of the laws handed down to the children of Israel by the LORD God through Moses, by which they were to govern themselves as a nation.   Activities were also conducted relating to the business affairs of the temple, such as the sale of sacrificial animals. The Levites, the thirteenth tribe, comprised the priesthood and were encamped immediately around the tabernacle.

Within the surround of the outer court was a containment called the “Holy Place.”  This chamber was kept holy and pure by the priests and ministers of the temple who prepared and conducted worship services representing Yahweh to his people and his people to Yahweh. A single doorway connected the Holy Place with the outer court.

 In the heart of the temple within the Holy Place, hidden and protected by a series of veils and much like a jewel in its setting,  was the “Holy of Hollies” where the spirit of God dwelt on earth with His chosen people.  Herein only the High Priest could enter, which he did once each year.  God’s presence with the Israelites was represented through the design of the temple with its priesthood, focused by the High Priest.

There was a specific design to the tabernacle which Moses built in the wilderness as well as the temple which Solomon would build about five hundred years later. Both of these temples reflected a design inherent in the human body.

Temples of King Solomon and Queen Sheba

Around 1000 BC King Solomon built a temple to house the Ark of the Covenant in Jerusalem according to the same design as the tabernacle of Moses, only much larger and more permanent and therefore more elaborate. He built it in honor of Melchizedek the King and High Priest of Salem.

(The word “Salem” derives from “Shalom,” a greeting of “Peace be to you.”  Thus the name “Jerusalem,” which means “City of Peace,” stands, even to this day of irony and paradox, as the name of a city torn by conflict and war throughout most of its turbulent yet enduring history.) 

The late biblical scholar and historian Grace Van Duzen (1912-2004) had studied these matters over many years and visited the Great Pyramid of Gizeh in Egypt, as well as other places in the Holy Land.  She also visited a temple at Deir el Bahari that was built by the “Queen of Sheba,” believed now to be the famed Queen Hatshepsut, near Thebes along the Nile River.  She built it after the design of Solomon’s temple, which the queen had seen when she visited Solomon.  Grace’s recently published masterpiece, THE BOOK Of GRACE — A Cosmic View Of The Bible, offers fresh and realistic insight into the stories in the Bible.  She describes Solomon’s temple in remarkable detail:

It would have been an awe-inspiring experience to enter the temple of Solomon.  The approach was by “ascents” or tiers which led to the interior of the temple.  Psalms 120 – 134, each called a “Song of degrees,” were sung on the tiers as the priests made their ascent to the increasingly sacred places in the temple. The oracle, or most holy place, would correspond to the Holy of Hollies in the tabernacle, which housed the cherubim.  In the grand temple, the 15-feet-high magnificent figures with the 15-feet wingspans which touched each other, would have been a glorious sight….   

The pattern of the human being, temple of the living God, embodies the same divine blueprint. The building of Solomon’s temple was in silence. Anything requiring noise was done outside.   The silence is a factor in all of God’s creation as the gift of heaven is endowed with Earth’s substance.  The wings of the two cherubim poetically depict the human brain, its positive and negative aspects in perfect harmony, fulfilling their divinely ordained function as created.  An awesome instrument, its design provides Almighty God (the power that created the universe) with the instrument whereby His Will may bring forth in Earth’s substance a unique form of the wonder and beauty of the cosmos.   (pp. 326-327)

Grace describes the Deir el Bahari temple that the “Queen of Sheba” built near Thebes in Eypt:

Today one can visit a magnificent temple at Deir el Bahari near Thebes, nestled against a wall of rose-colored cliffs.  I thoroughly enjoyed my visit there and marveled at the bas-reliefs on its walls that depict the reign of Queen Hatshepsut the outstanding event of which was her visit to a “holy land.”  This temple was built by the Queen of Sheba on her return from her visit to King Solomon, a small replica of his glorious edifice in Jerusalem.

Exquisite pictures adorn the walls of the Queen of Sheba’s temple in Egypt, revealing a dignified people with features unlike the Egyptians and a mystery to many through the years. These were Solomon’s people, whom the Queen described as happy and blessed, living in a glorious land which she called “God’s.”  She returned with gifts in abundance, pictured on the walls of her temple and itemized in the biblical record.  They included rare animals, flowers of all kinds and rare trees. . . .

. . . It is amazing that this replica, built on a very small scale, is the key, on a visual level, to the design and glory of Solomon’s mighty temple.  Even the ascents to the temple can be seen and traversed.  It has been called an “accident” in Egyptian architecture; nothing like it has ever been seen there and it is regarded by many as the most beautiful building in Egypt. When this temple was constructed a new temple service was initiated.  Twelve priests, with a high priest heading them, officiated before the altar.  The office of the high priest was established in the Egyptian service at the time of Queen Hatshepsut. (pg. 335)

Solomon’s kingdom represented the culmination of a failed cycle of restoration of the Body of Mankind—which began to move, actually, with Seth, one of Adam’s sons, out of whose lineage came Noah and, through Noah’s lineage, Abraham. The cycle was initiated with the sparing of Isaac’s life as he was about to be slain in a sacrificial offering by Abraham, his father, upon a mountain in the land of Moriah. With this action, Abraham brought to an end an ancient pattern of human sacrifice that had long been an integral part of ceremonial worship on earth.  The rest of the cycle as recorded in the Old Testament is the story of the rise and fall of the nation of Israel, which had several kings and prophets before it came to an end.  Among these was King Solomon.

I welcome your thoughts and comments. We will continue the journey in my next post.  Until then,

Be love. Be loved.

Anthony

tpal70@gmail.com

Angelic Stature

“Keep peace amidst the turmoil and your crown in the chaos.”

I received several responses to my previous post, which I always welcome and truly appreciate.  Don Hynes’s poem, from which the above quote is taken, found resonance in many.  With this post, I wish to visit my previous post where I intentionally omitted two phrases from the passage I borrowed from Martin Exeter’s service, which I did simply in an effort to be discrete so as not to place word barriers in anyone’s way that may bar them from reading on and hearing what I had to say.

The phrases I omitted are “the blatherings of Satan” and the phrase referring to angels “presenting themselves before the Lord and refusing to be distracted by Satan.”  My rationale is that words, like “Lord” and “Satan,” carry familiar baggage accumulated over the years from repeated usage with limited understanding . . . which also makes them useful in connecting with an audience.  The Master Jesus referenced the “laws and the prophets” and spoke in parables to connect with the people of his day.  With his disciples, whom he came to call “friends,” he spoke more directly as they had become seasoned enough for straight talk without the necessity for parables.   

Since the time these words of Lord Exeter were spoken some forty-three years ago, human consciousness has begun to awaken to the awareness of the oneness of heaven and earth in a multidimensional world of Reality. Those of us who have awakened to the truth know that neither God nor Satan are separate from human beings.  God is not “up there in heaven,” and Satan is not “down there in hell” somewhere, or lurking around whispering evil thoughts into our ears.  God is “so close as to not even be near,” as one spiritual author wrote, and Satan is none other than our own human mind when it is self-active and running its own thoughts rather than being the still lens it was created to be focusing the truth of love for our expression in living.  It can play the role of Satan with its blathering, or it can play the role of Lucifer, the Light-bearer.  My mind is at my command, and I decide the role it will play: “Be still and know that I Am your lord, Lucifer, and the Lord of lords is my Lord, to whom alone I am answerable.” Within the divine order and cosmology, there exists a network of focused points of light, some greater than others, nevertheless all contained within the wholeness of the One Supreme Being and Creator of the Universe. Thus the phrases “Lord of lords” and “King of kings.”

Perhaps I could take the liberty of paraphrasing so as to bring it all closer to home. For example: “I present my outer self before my inner Self and tell my blathering mind to be quiet and focus on what I have to say and do!”  That could be seen as the first step toward the resolution of noisome dissonance in my consciousness: stop the blathering of the mind and be quiet. The next step might best be understood in the context of this phrase: “I present myself in silence before the LORD of lords, having put my blathering mind behind me.” Just saying this effects an inner alignment of my human capacities—and attunement with the WORD, another verbal symbol for the LORD.  Yet, even this does not entirely remove the connotation of separateness. 

Finite words, symbols that they are, fall short in the effort to articulate infinite reality. It may be that we have come to that moment in time where silence alone is all that is necessary to resolve the dissonance in our collective consciousness and in the world. I recall a phrase from the Scriptures that says something about silence: “The Lord is in his holy temple. Let all the earth keep silence before Him.” (Habakkuk 20:20) There are times while watching the news that I know the meaning of this passage and I simply reach for the remote control and turn off the television, and the blathering of the media.     

I would now like to present an excerpt from an evocative service given by Lord Martin Exeter (1909-1988) given back in 1979.  Lord Martin Cecil Exeter became the Seventh Marquees of Exeter with the passing of his brother in 1981, He first moved to the Cariboo in the 1930s to take care of his family’s large ranch at 100 Mile House, BC., where he played a central role in its development.  In this excerpt, Lord Exeter speaks candidly to the reality of angelic presence in the world of dissonance and specifically how we as angels present ourselves to people in our worlds.  In his address to this particular gathering, he refers to those present as “emissaries,” signifying those who represent a higher realm of Being to a lower; in this case the Creator to creation. He speaks specifically to the “stature” of the angels incarnate and the role the angels play in the resurrection and ascension—first of human consciousness and then of the earth—to a higher level of being.

Whether or not human beings are aware, we are creator beings. As creator-beings—another term for angels—we incarnated on Earth at the bequest of our Creator.  In effect, we volunteered to come here and represent the Creator to His creation and creation to the Creator.  Included in our domain of representation are the people on earth—each of us individually having those in our immediate worlds for whom we are responsible in our representation.  Martin offers a comparative perspective with regard to the size of the earth, which may seem large to us, whereas in comparison to our universe, our planetary domicile and domain are very small.  On the other hand, the One whom we represent is large in comparison to the angel, and the countless host of angels that are in God are each one as a grain of sand in comparison to God. So we represent something very great and large to a rather small and seemingly insignificant world, and something comparatively small to an Almighty God.  If we think of this in terms of stature, our angelic stature is large relative to humans, while being quite small relative to God.

Martin speaks forthrightly to incarnate angels everywhere who are emerging in an apocalypse of angelic light speaking truth to power and handling situations in the world with assurance and integrity:

As angels, we do not wish to behave in a brash manner. At the same time we should never deny our stature in our dealings and relationships with the people. It seems that very often emissaries have felt at a disadvantage somehow when working with people in the world. What is meant when it is indicated that one should be spiritual? In the human view this means innocuous, unimportant, unnecessary. The attitude of human nature is that it can get along very well without anything spiritual, except possibly as some sort of an adjunct to human nature. If spiritual things can be used to advantage in what human nature wants to do, well let’s include spiritual things. But it is all self‑centered, isn’t it? As angels, we are certainly not at any disadvantage with respect to people. Our stature is vast relative to the stature of any particular human nature. And while this should not make us conceited—this is angelic nature—we certainly would not deny our authority or our ability to handle what needs to be handled as angels.

The Master never denied His own reality. Occasionally that seemed to get Him into hot water, but He was able to handle the hot water quite easily—no problem. As there is the greater emergence into expression of the angelic nature, we find ourselves at a considerable advantage in the world and in our dealings with people. We really know what it is that is going on, whereas human beings in the world have very little idea as to what is going on. They see things in a very restricted way. There is a very limited outlook and a great deal of uncertainty. Of course human nature puts on a good front occasionally, but let us not be fooled by that. As incarnate angels we are far more capable of handling what needs to be handled than anyone else is, no matter how much of an expert they may be. I’m not speaking particularly of some sort of technical expertise in which we might not be well‑versed. I am thinking of this more in terms of the handling of human nature, the handling of people. In all aspects of human nature function where people are concerned, we need to recognize that we ourselves have a far larger vision, a far greater understanding, than human nature people could possibly have. So we don’t downgrade ourselves. Let’s not put the day off, so that we have to be presented with some particular situation before we will admit that we really do know. Why not admit that we really do know right now?

The pressure of our representation of God to the people—which is what it is—is not particularly in question at the moment, at least not in a specific way in the external sense; but the opportunities will arise certainly in the days to come, where all of you will be handling people and situations in a manner that reveals your capacity to represent God. God isn’t silly and God isn’t stupid. God understands what the situation is. If we represent Him, that is true of us. We don’t need to bog ourselves down in some vast cosmic view and say, “Well I don’t understand that.” That’s not the point. Why would it be necessary to understand that? The only thing that is necessary is to understand the field of our own responsibility which, much of the time, is seemingly quite small. But occasionally we find ourselves projected into a situation where there are other people who are presumably supposed to be experts, but we find out that they are not, that we know a lot more than they do. They have all the book-learning which we may not have, but we have the understanding—and it’s not “Let it be by the hand of another,” but “Let it be by the Word of God.” And we are on hand to speak the Word of God.

Human beings have peculiar concepts about the Word of God—a sort of rolling thunder expression. But I don’t think you have much acquaintance with the Word of God in that clothing; that only happens in movies, doesn’t it, where a disembodied, echoing voice comes on the scene. That isn’t really the way it works. That’s fanciful imagination. Man was created with the voice mechanism so that the Word of God could be spoken on earth. And if the voice mechanism of man is not available to be used, the Word of God is not spoken on earth. But we are offering this mechanism for use, and so the Word of God can be spoken on earth because we are here and because we are handling these situations. And we don’t have any concept that what we say must sound as though it was God speaking, because that would be pandering to human nature, wouldn’t it? And it wouldn’t go down very well with human nature either.

All that is necessary is to speak the words that are necessary and that are fitting in the situation as it arises, having an awareness that we are the ones to handle it. This doesn’t mean either that we go barging in and pushing everybody else aside and say, “Well now I’m going to handle this!” We have no evidence that the Master ever did any such thing. He was quite discreet. However, when He found Himself in a situation, He did not deny His own reality. And He found Himself in a situation very often where the ball was tossed to Him. And we will find ourselves in such situations, partly because people want to test out, but partly also because there is an increasing awareness on the part of many that here is someone who could have the answer. So if the ball is tossed to us we handle it in whatever way may be fitting. We may hold onto the ball and provide what is necessary in a direct way. On the other hand it may be fitting sometimes to toss the ball back. The Master was very expert at this, so that those who were trying to put Him on the spot found themselves put on the spot.

What He said on such occasions has been clothed in a certain type of language, in the King James version of the Bible, which commonly we would not speak nowadays. That has tended to give a sort of aura which is deemed to characterize the words of God, as though we had to speak in Biblical language. No, we speak in the tongue that is now understood. We speak in tongues in this sense, so that those to whom we speak can understand us and can have the opportunity of receiving what it is we offer, without our engendering wrong reactions by what we say or how we say it. We learn to be very diplomatic on many occasions; we also learn to be very forthright on some occasions—whatever is fitting. And as we learn to offer what is spiritually fitting we are speaking the Word of God. This is the way by which what needs to be done on earth in our fields of responsibility may be done. We find that our stature is far greater than human nature stature.

Let us not ever try to inflate ourselves in human nature, because somebody is going to prick the balloon and then there is a sense of being shattered. On that basis one is always on the defensive. We are not on the defensive. We are just offering into every situation what is needed there. But our stature relative to human nature is great. We need to have a consciousness of this as our angelic nature emerges, begins to come forth. We are small before God, but we are large before people. I would stress the fact that being large before people doesn’t mean that we stand up and beat our chests. It just means that we reveal that we are capable. We are capable of doing whatever it is that needs to be done. We don’t thrust ourselves forward, but when we find the ball is in our hands we carry it, we do with it whatever is necessary. But there needs to be this sense of stature relative to human nature, so that you are never intimidated by human nature. You represent God to the people—and you couldn’t do this without being large. So there comes a consciousness of stature. It is enhanced by reason of the fact that one does find out, in various situations, that it really is true, that one has the stature. And, for some at least, there may be a little amazement to find out that one was so much more capable than everybody else in the human nature field. This is not to say that we may not find that there are those in the human nature field still who at the same time have some sensing of the reality of angelic stature. These people you will find work with you. Sometimes it will seem that the most unlikely people are the ones who work with you. The ones you have fingered as being the ones are not the ones at all. You let it prove itself out while retaining your own integrity and your own stature, your own sense of angelic nature.

So there is this largeness in the representation of God in one’s own experience but smallness in representing the people to God. There is always humility before God. This obviously is representing the right attitude of the people toward God: you are humble before God, you are very conscious of your insignificance in God. But the fact of insignificance in God, because God is so limitless, in no way denies your stature in the world. We have that stature, we are responsible for it. This is related to the upward view and the downward view. There is another way this is sometimes considered—the inward view and the outward view. Now we can see how this inward view, when people look in, there is a tendency for them to think that they are looking toward something rather small. And when we look out it’s this vastness—we live in a big world, and that big world goes on and on and on in a vast universe. We think of the largeness therefore as being external and the smallness internal, which, from our previous considerations, you can see is just the reverse of the fact. The smallness is external, the largeness is internal.

It has been said that we do not live inside our bodies but that our bodies live inside of us, at the center of our rather large energetic field, similar to the earth at the center of its gigantic magnetic field.  Our spirit is much larger than our form.  I welcome your thoughts as you wish to share them. Until then,

Be love. Be loved.

Anthony

tpal70@gmail.com

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