Creating the New Earth Together

Posts tagged ‘Consciousness’

Crossing the Dark Threshold . . . . . . into the Light of Day

“Waves of anger and fear Circulate over the bright And darkened lands of the earth . . . .”    (W.H. Auden, September 1,1939)

Plato described the transition from the old self to the authentic Self as moving from out of “the cave” of isolation, where life is observed as confused reflections on the walls of the cave, into the light of day where one is fully engaged as a liver of life rather than an observer only.

Crossing the Threshold                                                    

This passage of the soul from out of the dark cave and into the light of day is made much easier with the assistance of a “spiritual midwife,” or mentor.  One need not go it alone these days with the many spiritual guides and personal transformation facilitators available. 

 One such spiritual midwife, and “guru” to many, is Dr. Joan Borysenko, clinical psychologist and medical scientist, who has done much work in body-mind healing and spiritual transformation.  She offers some professional insight into this process of transformation in a tape series entitled, “The Power of the Mind to Heal.” With her permission, I would like to share with you now an excerpt from these tapes, primarily for the grounding in the work-a-day world her words provide, but also for the profound gift she brings into the healing field through her expression and her deep and compassionate understanding of humanity’s state of amnesia, out of which many today are awakening and struggling to make sense out of the events of a dawning new age which we are all seeing and experiencing in a new way.

From Dr. Borysenko’s tapes:

   “The events that call us forth from Plato’s ‘Cave’ are different for each of us, and perhaps the best prayer in times of trouble is not to pray for the troubles to cease but to pray that our hearts and minds stay open to change so that we’ll emerge from our crisis transformed, wiser and more loving.

   “Unfortunately we’ve lost our cultural understanding of the value of darkness. Suffering and pain are downright unpopular in a culture that’s addicted to ‘positive thinking.’  But a lot of what passes as ‘positive thinking’ isn’t positive at all . . . .  A lot of us slap on a veneer of positivity and phony faith to hide a heart full of pain and fear.

   “The psychologist Carl Jung put it very clearly when he said that we can’t find the light by imagining good things.  The only way to the light is to go back out through the darkness.  Then we can emerge transformed with truly changed minds. 

   “The mythologist, Joseph Campbell, said, ‘one thing that comes out in myths is at the bottom of the abyss comes the voice of salvation. The black moment is the moment when the real message of transformation is going to come. At the darkest moment comes the light.’”

This has certainly been true in my own experience of dark times.  Another way this has been expressed is “The darkest hour is the one before the dawn.”  Some of my best days have been after two or three days of internal void and mental cloudiness, passing through layers in the veil. We may be fortunate to have had someone represent the light of Being to us so vividly and powerfully that we are able to forge a path all the way to the most sacred and holy place within us and perhaps even fuse in rapturous union with the Beloved, losing ourselves to the world and entirely into the arms of Love.  Sometimes, in such ecstatic experiences “in the light,” the path we forged with the help of another’s light closes up behind us and we lose our way back out into the world.  We leave the world to ascend the mountain of spiritual attainment and enlightenment, where we stay for a season knowing that we must return to the world we left behind.

Often we have to find our way back out on our own through a heart cluttered with fears and doubts and a mind rigidly structured with beliefs and prejudices of sorts we never even imagined were there.  This time, however, we have only our own light, which by now we have learned to shine, to light up the path leading out into the world of hard facts and experiences. For me, finding my way back out into the light of day where I could be of real value and service to others has been the greatest test of my spiritual awakening and transformation.  The most difficult of tasks has been to learn how to reach out and to touch people where they are.  I could not have done it without help, without someone to at least provide a sounding board for clarifying issues and validating my own gut perceptions and new-found sense of true self-worth.  One way and the other, both in going in to find oneself and in coming out to reveal the wonderful one I discovered my Self to be, one has to traverse the darkness of the cave where the false, isolated self spent its entire life wandering around in a solitary way.

Dr. Borysenko describes this transitional period from her professional point of view as represented quite often by physical, mental and emotional symptoms of so-called “dysfunction.”

   “Not only have we lost our appreciation of the value of darkness as an authentic path to the light, we’ve also lost the priesthood whose function it was to bring us through the transitions.  All too often our religious priesthood is as out of touch with sources of wisdom as is our secular priesthood—therapists and psychiatrists [and I would include here health care physicians] who think more in terms of pathology than they do of growth and potential.

   “We can learn a great deal about approaching these times of transition by observing how the priesthood of more primitive societies treats people in transition—whether the transition comes unbidden or whether it is set into motion by a special ritual or rite of passage.

   “The anthropologist, Victor Turner, is well known for his study of the ritual process in different cultures.  He defines a ritual as a ‘rite of passage,’ a transition between two distinct states of being, or stations in society.  The traditional rite of passageway in primitive cultures consists of three distinct stages: the separation from one’s previous state of being; the liminal period during which you dwell between two worlds, not here and not there; and the reincorporation afterwards into some new role or status in the society.

   “The ambiguous intermediate state of liminality is a kind of dwelling at the threshold of a new life.  It’s often compared to being in the womb, in a state of darkness and invisibility, or ‘wandering in the wilderness.’ The Jews wandered in the wilderness for forty years when they left bondage in Egypt, a time of dwelling at the threshold before they were re-born to a new life in Palestine. Jesus, too, wandered for forty days in the wilderness when he died to his old self, the carpenter, and was reborn to his God Self.

   “Each of us, in that very same movement from our separate ego to our God Self, has to do some wandering in exile and in this period we may feel confused, unhappy and like we have nothing left to hold onto.  If our culture hadn’t gotten so out of touch with the meaning of ritual and myth, we would know that this ‘no-man’s land’, the ‘dark night of the soul’ between the death of our old self and the birth of our new Self was grace, not ‘mental illness’ or ‘PMS’.”

What a wonderful and empowering attitude to hold toward a health crisis, or a life crisis, that might come our way seemingly just about the time we thought everything was going so well in our lives. I know for a fact, just from my own personal experience with physical illness, that unresolved inner issues come up to be addressed when the physical body is undergoing a viral cleansing, for example. One is compelled to be thankful for such interruptions sent by life perhaps to get one’s attention. It is believed by some psychologists that our own sub-conscious minds create the symptoms of dis-ease in order to alert us to the need to address important issues in our lives.   We can rest in assurance that all is well during times of crisis rather than tense up in fear of the unknown.  Healing can come quickly as we listen to our inner voice for the very specific message that will open the door to us for transformation. It is there if we are quiet enough, and honest enough, to hear it. Joan continues:

“The collective hypnosis—our unconscious adherence to the familiar beliefs that guide our lives—is broken in the liminal period, in that time of exile, in exactly the same way our own uncelebrated life crises strip us of what we know, delivering us to the threshold of the unknown. In times of transition we awaken from the familiar terrain of life and find ourselves in alien territory.  If we know that this frightening, unknown period was a necessary transition, like the transition period of labor, we could more easily ask for whatever help was needed, and more patiently hold on and wait for the birth.  We could take comfort that the process was natural, not pathological.    Each dark night and each little death peals away a layer of conditioning, restoring our sight so that we can see more clearly.  What a difference it would make if a person in the throes of a life crisis were called an ‘initiate’ and then skillfully led to a rebirth. Instead, our psychological initiates are often labeled neurotic, psychotic, addictive or character disordered, labels that create helplessness and low self-esteem. These labels reinforce the fearful story that we are damaged and less than whole.    Some of the power of the ‘Twelve-Step Recovery Program’ comes from the context in which addiction in placed. In anonymous programs, addictions are transitions between a life where the person was out of touch with a higher power and one in which the reality of that power becomes not only the force for recovery but also a renewal of the meaning of life. Addiction as a liminal experience, for those who are willing to see it in that light, creates excitement, empowerment and even gratitude for the addiction as a guide to a new, more self-aware and fulfilling life.”

It is one thing to admit that one’s physical body is addicted to a drug, such as alcohol, and to take the necessary steps toward sobriety and non-dependency.  It is another thing entirely to take on the label of “alcoholic” as one’s identity.  The statements “I am an alcoholic” or “I am a drug addict” can serve to dispel patterns of denial, but it isn’t the truth of who one is.  Such firmly held fixations in consciousness could come to hide awareness of one’s real identity.  This can set up a circular codependent relationship between condition and treatment in which one must continue being an “alcoholic” in order to participate in the process of treatment, and vice versa.  Further, one might be prone to think that, without that identity, one would become as nothing.

In the health field, similar situations arise where one becomes identified with the “disease” for which one is being treated.  To continue saying, for example, “I am a diabetic” fixes the condition of diabetes even more firmly in consciousness, which in turn creates the vibrational terrain that determines health and dis-ease in the body-mind continuum.  What if one were to say instead, for example, “I am fine.  My body, however, is having some difficulty handling sugar at this time, so I will withhold sugar from my diet until such time as I have corrected the reason(s) for the difficulty?” This, in my view, would be more accurate as well as the intelligent and cooperative first step to take toward a holistic approach to healing while engaging orthodox, traditional disciplines and therapeutic methodologies.   (Excerpted from Sacred Anatomy)

I will continue with this theme in my next post.  Thank you for sharing my meditations. I would love to share any thoughts you may have. Until my next post,

Be love. Be loved.

Anthony

tpal70@gmail.com

Apocalypse of Light 2013, Part 5: Questions Answered, page 5, Cosmic Consciousness

Deepak Chopra

Deepak Chopra

 

Deepak Chopra defines cosmic consciousness very succinctly: 

In cosmic consciousness the psyche or individual consciousness expands to a cosmic or universal level. The small personality with its identification with the body, the mind and relationships makes a radical shift so that the self now identifies with the non-local, timeless existence of the cosmos. So it is called cosmic consciousness. —Deepak Chopra

Walter Russell expands on the topic — and more — in the “QUESTIONS ANSWERED” part of his book THE MESSAGES OF THE DIVINE ILIAD.

Walter Russell

Walter Russell

 

Q. Did Jesus know all things? I mean by that, did He have omniscience?

A. Yes, He did have omniscience. He was undoubtedly the only man who had known complete Cosmic Consciousness. 

Q. Can a cosmic conscious man see Jesus as a person?

A. No one has ever seen the Person of Jesus-or Beethoven-or you. The body alone can be seen and the Person alone can be known.

Q. Are Jesus and God the same?

A. Yes, they are One-and so are you One with God when you know that you are.

Q. What is the Soul?

A. Soul is the desire force in Mind, the will to extend desire from the Light to manifest the Light
in form.

Q. How does desire manifest itself?

A. Without desire, the seed would not germinate into form. The Soul centers the seed in the pattern of desire to express form. The seed records the pattern of the body as it changes throughout eternity. The
record changes according to the desire of the Soul-will to become a different body. 

Q. Could you give an example?

A. Yes. The pattern of a tree in Maine where the winds blow hard is recorded in the seed of that tree. The same ruggedness of pattern will be recorded in the seed and repeated as the same kind of tree when the seed again unfolds. 

Q. Your statement that trees have Souls as well as human beings is rather extraordinary. Would you explain it further?

A. The Soul is universal in all things. It does not belong to man alone. God is Light. The Soul is DESIRE in the Light. It might also be termed the WILL.

Q. How does animal life differ from vegetable and mineral life?

A. What you call animal life is not rooted to earth. It has entirely different bodies which must interchange in order to continue. The vegetable kingdom is rooted to earth. The mineral kingdom is the earth itself.

All of these function alike. They all begin and end in the same way. 

Q. What are their relations to each other? Which comes first?

A. The mineral kingdom comes first-the planet is all mineral until sufficiently cooled by the coming of water. Interchange between water and minerals begets the vegetable kingdom.

Interchange between the vegetable and mineral kingdoms begets the animal kingdom. Each of these three depends upon each other or survival. Each is an extension of the other. 

I marvel at the depth and height of Russell’s understanding. A man who truly tapped the secrets of the universe and articulated the simple truth of it all.

I will end this series at this point to explore some of the profound perspectives and transcendent vision of Hugh Malafry as shared in his landmark and timely novel The Light at Lindisfarne. So, until next post,

Be Love. Be loved.

Tony's picture 2 from PeggyAnthony

Read my Health Light Newsletter online at LiftingTones.com. 

 

Apocalypse of Light 2013, Part 5: Questions Answered, page 4, Meditation

Tony's picture 2 from PeggyWe’ve been sharing excerpts from the chapter “Questions Answered” in Walter Russell’s 1948 book, THE MESSAGE OF THE DIVINE ILIAD. The question for today’s post relates to meditation. 

Until I actually sat down and meditated, as I do on some mornings when I arise early, I thought that meditation was a complicated and arduous spiritual practice. I mean, quiet the mind from thinking?! My mind?!  My mind never stops thinking.  At least what I used to think of as thinking: a mind busying itself in thought – inquiry, judgement, imagination, figuring things out, etc. That’s not really thinking. It’s entertaining thoughts passing through.  True thinking arises out of stillness when the human mind disengages itself from the stream of thoughts flowing through it and, like a turning water wheel, engages with the stream of consciousness flowing from above, down, inside and out.  My spiritual mentor says it very succinctly in these words from a poem he wrote:

. . . Busy thought and troubled feeling

Trespass not in virtue’s wise serenity

Where firm control and awful power eternally abide.

Here Earth’s pains are healed

And cruel chaos of mind’s spawning

Is called again to order and to beauty.  ( Martin Cecil, “Thus It Is”)

When I simply got still and listened to the sounds around me, I suddenly became aware that I am nothing more than the awareness that makes the sounds and sights in my world heard and seen. Without me, they simply would not exist. Then IT caught me and took me in.  IT being what I was using meditation to find by somehow “going in.” It came forth and found me once I got still enough and allowed the thoughts to enter and leave my mind without following them or chasing them away. You really can’t “go in” to find your Self.  Your Self has to come out into expression to be known through experience. Effortless expression is the key.  There’s no special technique or formula for meditation, as Russell suggests here: 

Q. I know that the wonderful freedom of easy breathing, just as the keenness of the senses, is closely associated with inner-feeling. Is there any simple rule that might be applied to bring about that condition of ecstasy which is characteristic of cosmic conscious people or even to induce meditation?

A. There is no necessity for a technique or formula for meditation. Inner-feeling, or inner-knowing, is the Silent Voice of inspiration within us. One automatically breathes easier as desire for effort ceases. The more forgetful one is of one’s body, the more one is freed for the transition from outer emotions to conscious stillness.

If one desires that ecstasy of being in the God-Light, breathing will become effortless. It will slow the heartbeat also by relaxing the body. One of the greatest means of relaxing the body is to stop thinking and meditate — to become one with the Spirit. 

That is the reward of living the conscious life-the most wonderful thing that can happen to anyone. 

A LENS AND A NET

The human mind is like a lens.  It provides the capacity for focus. As a vibrational substance which arises out of the physical body, it is responsive to energy passing through it, such as thought forms. It concentrates its substance around them in order to magnify them. Like a net for snaring birds, the mind has the ability to snare thoughts and blow them up, expand them and even build concepts on and around then so that they become heavy constructs that clutter the mind and prevent fluidity ad flexibility of thinking. 

Those thoughts can come from without and from within. It’s the ones that come from without that the mind is able to snare based on resonance and frequency size.  Like a net that catches birds but whose mesh is too large to snare butterflies, the mind can only snare large thoughts and concepts. The finer essences of spirit slip right through the net on their way out from within. This is how human being can remain alive, even with destructive thinking and behavior.  Life trickles through even the most crowded and structured mental capacities.

AN UNDERSTANDING HEART

The heart is a finer net that can catch the butterflies of inspiration. These inspirational thoughts lift up the heart and the mind to heights of profound awareness wherein the things of spirit can be contemplated, known and understood. Remember, it was King Solomon who asked the Lord for wisdom and an understanding heart.

There’s a Psalm that speaks of the “snare of the fowler” with which I would like to close this post and leave you to meditate upon. It’s Psalm 91. 

   He that dwelleth in the secret place of the most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty.

   I will say of the Lord, He is my refuge and my fortress: My God; in him will I trust.

   Surely he shall deliver thee from the snare of the fowler, and from the noisome pestilence.

   He shall cover thee with his feathers, and under his wings shalt thou trust: his truth shall be thy shield     and buckler.

   Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night; nor the arrow that flieth by day.    Nor for the pestilence that walketh in darkness; nor the destruction that wasteth at noonday.

   A thousand shall fall at thy side, and ten thousand at thy right hand; but it shall not come nigh thee.

   Only with thine eyes shalt thou behold and see the reward of the wicked.

   Because thou hast made the LORD, which is my refuge, even the most High, thy habitation;

   There shall no evil befall thee, neither shall any plague come nigh thy dwelling.

   For he shall give his angels charge over thee,  lest thou dash thy foot against a stone.

   Thou shalt tread upon the lion and adder: the young lion and the dragon shalt thou trample under feet.

   Because he hath set his love upon me, therefore will I deliver him: I will set him on high, because he hath known my name.

   He shall call upon me, and I will answer him: I will be with him in trouble; I will deliver him, and honour him.

   With long life will I satisfy him, and shew him my salvation.

All this is available for experience during meditation.  And it need not take an hour to become aware of it. Just be still and know . . . and it will find you more quickly than you can find it.  Until my next post,

Be love. Be loved.

Read my Health Light Newsletter on line at LiftingTones.com. The current article is “Celebrating 50 Years of Service.” Enjoy reading a brief synopsis of the fascinating history of chiropractic and my journey as a chiropractor and alternative healthcare practitioner.

 

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