Creating the New Earth Together

Posts tagged ‘Consciousness’

The Mystery of Consciousness: Conveyor of Light and Love

Where your heart is, there also is your treasure. 

A LINE FROM A POPULAR POEM BY RUMI about a field “Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing” has been repeating in my head since I published my previous post: “When the soul lies down in that grass, the world is too full to talk about.”  And it truly is. There’s just so much going on in our world today for one to crowd into one’s thimble-size mind.  Another saying that Rumi penned from his home in Konya, Turkey, speaks of the heart’s treasure: “I looked in temples, churches and mosques. But I found the Divine in my heart.” 

In the movie “The Sound of Music,” Maria (Julie Anderson) sings “I go to the hills when my heart is lonely.”  Today, amidst the devastation in Ukraine and the repercussions the sanctions levied against Russia are having on the economy here and globally, I go to my heart to find peace and sanity.  Peace, because love abides here; sanity, because in my heart I know and understand that all is well in the Hands of God. 

By divine design, we human beings are the hands of God here on Earth.  Whatever happens, let me be a beacon of light in the darkness of human consciousness . . . and human consciousness is truly filled with darkness.  But darkness is simply the absence of light.  It’s not something of itself.  It’s nothing.  Light is something! Let there be light! 

A large mass of humanity has withdrawn from the light of love and hunkered down in the shadows of fear and uncertainty.  But let the Spirit of Love move upon the face of the waters of human consciousness and, Voila! There is light! And the light shines in the darkness, but the darkness does not comprehend it. “How can you be so calm and peaceful amid such atrocities and violence?! Where is your outrage!? Your condemnation of Putin and his murderous foot-soldiers who have exterminated tens-of-thousands of their fellow countrymen, women and children included?!” Such reactions are only incapacitating spiritually and contribute nothing but fuel to the fires raging in human hearts and minds, clouding and darkening vision.  If there’s one thing needed at this time it’s clear vision.

Whatever happens, let me be a beacon of light in the darkness

I find it somewhat challenging to refrain from outrage and remain non-judgmental in all of this death and destruction being heaped upon Ukraine and her citizens.  But that doesn’t mean I have blinders over my eyes.  I see clearly what is happening—at least what the news is telling and showing us—but only with my eyes. 

“A thousand shall fall at thy side, and ten-thousand at thy right hand; but it shall not come nigh thee, for only with thine eyes shalt thou see and behold the reward of the wicked.” (Psalm 91:7). 

I looked up the word wicked and it has several connotations and applications: vicious, depraved, (wicked habits); mischievous or playfully malicious (a wicked joke); obnoxious or offensive (a wicked stench); formidable or excellent (a wicked tennis player).  The Psalmist most likely would characterize the wicked as “vicious” and “depraved.” Who, then, are these “wicked” ones who are reaping their rewards? I think we all have had some part in wickedness; surely any and all who have lived for the material treasures of the world rather than the spiritual treasures of Heaven. 

CONVEYOR OF SPIRIT

Perhaps it’s a bit of a stretch, although a good segue to the theme of this post, the word “wicked” has the word “wick” as its root—which is a woven chord for conveying liquid, like the wick of a candle which is designed to convey the melting candle wax up to fuel the flame for light.  Consciousness is a conveyor of Spirit, given to us by the Creator as a means of connecting with Heaven and for conveying the Light of Truth and Love into the world.  By design, we are much like the whirling dervishes of Turkey who spin ’round and ’round, with one hand pointed upward toward heaven and the other hand turned downward toward the earth, as they provide a channel for bringing Love down from God into the world.  

There’s a wise saw that says you can’t fix a problem at the same level as the problem, but from a level above the level of the problem.  And so it is with the problems that plague human consciousness.  The solutions are to come from above and not from below.  The design for the New Earth descends from Heaven above into the heaven of human consciousness . . . but only as there is room to receive it.  Filled with wickedness, there’s no room for the Truth of Life, which is Love.  We need to cast the devil—literally the divider—out of our heaven, as Jesus did: “Get thee hence!”  Then there will be room for the Truth of the New Earth to emerge from the New Heaven and replace the old earth. 

A large part of the old heaven is occupied by the Christian belief that Jesus came down to earth from Heaven to die for our sins and redeem “us sinners” from the hands of the Devil.  That is a redaction and a lie conjured up by Saint Paul and the Council of Nicaea, the most grievous of lies ever perpetrated upon human beings. 

The truth is that Christ, the Son of God, incarnated in Jesus and came to show us how to love God and one another.  That’s the truth, and I think it’s time that Christians, and particularly Catholics, do away with their crucifixes and repent for having worshiped the murderous crucifixion of the Son of God all these centuries.  I am certain that He doesn’t want nor like that his crucifixion is still being celebrated as the purpose for his visitation to this planet.  We can celebrate His life and victory over death by His resurrection without dragging him through that ignominious ordeal in our memories and our Holy Week liturgies.  Please, take him down from the cross and worship the Father in spirit and in truth, which is all He asked.  His true passion was and is the return of Love of God and love for one another to humanity and to His Father’s world. 

If a cross is needed, one can replace the crucifix with the balanced cross of St. Benedict, which is a plus ⊕, symbolizing a cross-over point between Heaven and Earth, which is what Jesus was and what we are designed to be.  (This cross is believed to protect one from the Devil and was used in exorcisms to cast out demons.)

I’ll leave you with the beautiful and rich Russian choral music of Grechaninov’s Passion Week, Op. 58:1, Behold the Bridegroom, performed by the Phoenix Bach Choir, Kansas City Chorale, conducted by Charles Bruffy.  Enjoy this first track of the album.

https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=65aDlqi4KQI&feature=share

Have a Happy Easter Sunday. Until my next post,

Be love. Be loved. 

Anthony

tpal70@gmail.com

 

Biocentrism 2: “Where Is The Universe?” Part 1

   The Holy Place of Creation

FROM MY READERS:  Neil Salka writes:  Some heavy duty thoughts you are writing about. Thank you. Love getting your posts.  In the last one about biocentrism towards the end, you write: “one fully understands that there is no independent external universe outside of biological existence,…..” now that thought alone stirs up in my mind: are you stating that we are actually/essentially dead outside of ‘biological existence’?  Dead in consciousness therefore no ‘life’ as we understand it? If there is no biological existence, what or where is life and consciousness? and then instead of: what happened in the second after big bang? it might be better to ask: where did my consciousness (life) come from? so life/consciousness came FIRST and then the body/biological existence. . . . first the Heaven, then the earth. Is heaven simply consciousness?

Great questions, Neil, both of which stop scientists in their tracks . . . and great segue to this post. Let’s explore your questions.

For as far back as I can remember, I’ve had a vivid awareness of being an immortal spiritual being. This awareness emphasizes itself as I move my arms to reach out and my legs to walk — presently as I move my fingers across the keyboard typing out the thoughts emerging through my mind while composing this blog post. 

Having studied the anatomy and physiology of the physical body, I am aware of the complex chemical, neurological, muscular, circulatory and skeletal systems involved in moving the various parts of my anatomy.  They work quite smoothly and cooperatively together with instantaneous precision in finding the right keys to type a word, a sentence, a complete thought.  That being so, I know that my brain does not decide nor originate my body’s movements.  It is clearly used in the process, along with all the other anatomical parts — and there are habitual patterns of movement developed simply by repetitive practice, such as in piano playing and typing.  But the brain is not the author nor originator of my movements.  The author and creator of my body’s movements is the immortal being that I AM incarnate in this earthen form — and, believe it or not, this has been proven scientifically.  Read on. 

In the following excerpt from Dr. Robert Lanza’s¹ book BIOCENTRISM,² he delves into the illusion of separate internal and external realities, which brings us to a consideration of the second principle of biocentrism — which I will let the author explain and develop in his own words.

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The Second Principle of Biocentrism: Our external and internal perceptions are inextricably intertwined.  They are different sides of the same coin and cannot be separated.”

First . . . simple logic must be used to answer a most basic question: where is the universe located?  It is here that we will need to deviate from conventional thinking and shared assumptions, some of which are inherent in language itself.

All of us are taught since earliest childhood that the universe can be fundamentally divided into two entities: ourselves, and that which is outside of us. This seems logical and apparent.  What is “me” is commonly defined by what I can control.  I can move my fingers, but I cannot wiggle your toes.  This dichotomy, then, is based largely on manipulation. The dividing line between self and non-self is generally taken to be the skin, strongly implying that I am this body and nothing else.

Of course when a chunk of the body has vanished, as some unfortunate amputees have experienced, one still feels oneself to be just as “present” and “here” as before, and not subjectively diminished in the least. This logic could be carried forth easily enough until one arrives at solely the brain itself perceiving itself as “me”—because if a human head could be maintained with an artificial heart and the rest, it too would reply “Here!” if its name were shouted at roll call. 

Now, this is a rather simplified, as well as divisive, description of “me” versus “you” and everything “out there” not enveloped within my skin.  We know, or at lease believe, that all is one and that there is no energetic separation between the multifaceted and diverse forms and entities in the Universe—and there is only apparent separation between the outer borders of physical forms in the Universe.  The question this doctor raises in his book is “Where is the Universe?” Where does it exist as far as we are concerned and aware?  According to the principles of Biocentrism, the Universe exists solely in the back of our cognitive brains, projected there by our eyes via the complex workings of the visual cortex.  

WHERE ARE THE SENSATIONS OF LIFE?

We can start with everything visual that is currently being perceived all around us — this book you are holding, for example. Language and custom say that it all lies outside us in the external world. Yet we’ve already seen that nothing can be perceived that is not already interacting with our consciousness, which is why biocentric axiom number one is that nature or the so-called external world must be correlative with consciousness. One doesn’t exist without the other. What this means is that when we do not look at the Moon the Moon effectively vanishes-which, subjectively, is obvious enough. If we still think of the Moon and believe that it’s out there orbiting the Earth, or accept that other people are probably watching it, all such thoughts are still mental constructs. The bottom-line issue here is if no consciousness existed at all, in what sense would the Moon persist, and in what form?

So what is it that we see when we observe nature? The answer in terms of image-location and neural mechanics is actually more straightforward than almost any other aspect of biocentrism. Because the images of the trees, grass, the book you’re holding, and everything else that’s perceived is real and not imaginary, it must be physically happening in some location. Human physiology texts answer this without ambiguity. Although the eye and retina gather photons that deliver their payloads of bits of the electromagnetic force, these are channeled through heavy-duty cables straight back until the actual perception of images themselves physically occurs in the back of the brain, augmented by other nearby locations, in special sections that are as vast and labyrinthine as the hallways of the Milky Way, and contain as many neurons as there are stars in the galaxy. This, according to human physiology texts, is where the actual colors, shapes, and movement “happen.” This is where they are perceived or cognized.

If you consciously try to access that luminous, energy-filled, visual part of the brain, you might at first be frustrated; you might tap the back of your skull and feel a particularly vacuous sense of nothingness. But that’s because it was an unnecessary exercise: you’re already accessing the visual portion of the brain with every glance you take. Look now, at anything. Custom has told us that what we see is “out there,” outside ourselves, and such a viewpoint is fine and necessary in terms of language and utility, as in “Please pass the butter that’s over there.” But make no mistake: the visual image of that butter, that is, the butter itself, actually exists only inside your brain. That is its location. It is the only place visual images are perceived and cognized.

Some may imagine that there are two worlds, one “out there” and a separate one being cognized inside the skull. But the “two worlds” model is a myth. Nothing is perceived except the perceptions themselves, and nothing exists outside of consciousness. Only one visual reality is extant, and there it is. Right there.

The “outside world” is, therefore, located within the brain or mind. Of course, this is so astounding for many people, even if it is obvious to those who study the brain, that it becomes possible to over-think the issue and come up with attempted refutations. “Yeah, but what about someone born blind?” “And what about touch; if things aren’t out there, how can we feel them?”

In the previous chapter, the author describes the tactile perception of a “solid” external world.

What about if you touch something? Isn’t it solid? Push on the trunk of the fallen tree and you feel pressure. But this too is a sensa­tion strictly inside your brain and only “projected” to your fingers, whose existence also lies within the mind. Moreover, that sensation of pressure is caused not by any contact with a solid, but by the fact that every atom has negatively charged electrons in its outer shells.  As we all know, charges of the same type repel each other, so the bark’s electrons repel yours, and you feel this electrical repulsive force stopping your fingers from penetrating any further. Nothing solid ever meets any other solids when you push on a tree. The atoms in your fingers are each as empty as a vacant football stadium in which a single fly sits on the fifty-yard line. If we needed solids to stop us (rather than energy fields), our fingers could easily penetrate the tree as if we were swiping at fog.

None of that changes the reality: touch, too, occurs only within consciousness or the mind. Every aspect of that butter, its existence on every level, is not outside of one’s being. The real mind-twister to all this, and the reason some are loath to accept what should be patently obvious, is that its implications destroy the entire house-of-­cards worldview that we have embraced all our lives. If that is consciousness, or mind, right in front of us, then consciousness extends indefinitely to all that is cognized — calling into question the nature and reality of something we will devote an entire chapter to: space. If that before us is consciousness, it can change the area of scientific focus from the nature of a cold, inert, external universe to issues such as how your consciousness relates to mine and to that of the animals. But we’ll put aside, for the moment, questions of the unity of consciousness. Let it suffice to say that any overarching unity of consciousness is not just difficult or impossible to prove but is fundamentally incompatible with dualistic languages — which adds an additional burden of making it difficult to grasp with logic alone. 

Why? Language was created to work exclusively through symbolism and to divide nature into parts and actions. The word water is not actual water, and the word it corresponds to nothing at all in the phrase “It is raining.” Even if well acquainted with the limitations and vagaries of language, we must be especially on guard against dismissing biocentrism (or any way of cognizing the universe as a whole) too quickly if it doesn’t at first glance seem compatible with customary verbal constructions; we will discuss this at much greater length in a later chapter. The challenge here, alas, is to peer not just behind habitual ways of thinking, but to go beyond some of the tools of the thinking process itself, to grasp the universe in a way that is at the same time simpler and more demanding than that to which we are accustomed. Absolutely everything in the symbolic realm, for example, has come into existence at one point in time, and will eventually die — even mountains. Yet consciousness, like aspects of quantum theory involving entangled particles, may exist outside of time altogether.   (To be concluded in my next post)

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THE IMAGINAL REALM OF CREATION

There’s a biblical passage that says “The thoughts and imagining of men’s hearts are only evil continually.” They don’t have to continue being evil.  I am here, along with a host of other incarnate angels, to change that, so that the world and the people in the world can be safe and made new in our consciousness.  

Consciousness can be seen as the “Imaginal Realm,” the Holy Place where creation and re-creation take place, and out of which creation emerges into the realm of visible, material form.  It is also the realm in which visions and visitations from heavenly beings take place.  Here in this vibratory garden the true design of form is seeded by Life from above and within the Heavenly Kingdom of heavens — the garden of consciousness being the heaven out of which the kingdoms of this world emerge.  It is also a vibrational workshop, so-to-speak, for re-creation and for making all things new again.  The image of our world being projected from “outside” into our consciousness is herein made available for our co-creative work of re-creation in the heaven.  “Behold, I create and make all things new!” is our intention and command as co-creators with the Creator and with one another.  Consciousness is, in that sense, an aspect of who we are.  I am consciousness and I create my world.  Collectively, We are Consciousness and We create our world together as one body of Man, male and female, made in the image and likeness of God. To participate with the Creator at this level requires that we relinquish our false temporary identity as creatures and rise up to take on our true and immortal identity as creator Beings.  I will continue along this vein of consideration in future posts of this series.  As always, I welcome your participation by sharing your thoughts.  Until my next post, 

Be love. Be loved. 

Anthony

tpal70@gmail.com

You may enjoy reading articles relative to health and wholeness on my HealthLight Newsletter blog: LiftingTones.com

REFERENCES:

¹ROBERT LANZA, MD, is one of the most respected scientists in the world—A U.S. News & World Report cover story called him a “genius” and a “renegade thinker,” and likened him to Einstein. Currently chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology and an adjunct professor at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Lanza has hundreds of publications and inventions and more than two dozen scientific books to his credit, including Principles if Tissue Engineering, recognized as the definitive reference in the field.  BOB BERMAN is one of the best-known astronomers in the world. He is Astronomy magazine’s “Strange Universe” columnist as well as the former astronomy columnist for Discover and it responsible for the astronomy section of The Old Farmer’s Almanac.

²BIOCENTRSM, How Life and Consciousness are the Keys to Understanding the True Nature of the Universe.  In recent years quantum theory has forced a sea of change in Western natural philosophy, casting doubt on traditional physical explanations of the universe’s genesis and structure. Biocentrism completes this shift in worldview as it takes on one of the key tenets of Western thinking: that all life ultimately reduces to physics. In its place it offers the revolutionary view that biology is primary — that life creates the universe, not the other way around.

Biocentrism: Behold! And Everything Matters!

“The only things we perceive are our perceptions.” —George Berkeley

OUR RELATIONSHIP WITH THE UNVERSE and with our world is one of creator with creation—not merely in a mechanical or physical sense, as in building houses, roads and cities. I’m thinking in terms of the dynamics of quantum physics, the realm of preform where everything in held in “wave form” until it materializes into “particle form” in the simple action of being observed by a conscious being. 

Do Christmas and New Years exist outside of human consciousness?  For that matter, does anything exist outside of human consciousness? According to Biocentrism, there is an existential relationship between life, consciousness and physical reality. The world of “solid” form springs into visible existence the moment it is observed. A tree falling in the forest makes no sound without someone present who has the capacity to perceive the perturbed air molecules and interpret them as sound.  A candle’s flame of hot gas has no color or glow unless a functional pair of eyes are present to observe it and call it candlelight.   

This is the fascinating field of Biocentrism as explored and elucidated by Robert Lanza, MD with the assistance of Bob Berman.  From the introduction of their book BIOICENTRISM—How Life and Consciousness are the Keys to Understanding the True Nature of the Universe:

This book proposes a new perspective: that our current theories of the physical world don’t work, and can never be made to work, until they account for life and consciousness. This book proposes that, rather than a belated and minor outcome after billions of years of lifeless physical processes, life and consciousness are absolutely fundamental to our understanding of the universe. We call this new perspective biocentrism.

I will do my best to represent their tenacious explorations and resultant findings in a series of blog posts.  I hope you will enjoy this series and benefit by the work of these two critical thinkers.  There are seven “Principles of Biocentrism.”  I will take them one by one with each post. 

The First Principle of Biocentrism: “What we perceive as reality is a process that involves our consciousness.”

Our science to date has failed to recognize those special properties of life that make it fundamental to material reality. This view of the world in which life and consciousness are the bottom line in understanding the larger Universe—biocentrism—revolves around the way a subjective experience, which we call consciousness, relates to a physical process. . . .

Some of the thrill that came with the announcement that the human genome had been mapped or the idea that we are close to understanding the first second of time after the Big Bang rests in our innate human desire for completeness and totality.

But most of these comprehensive theories fail to take into account one crucial factor: we are creating them. It is the biological creature that fashions the stories, that makes the observations, and that gives names to things. And therein lies the great expanse of our oversight, that science has not confronted the one thing that is at once most familiar and most mysterious: conscious awareness. As Emerson wrote in “Experience,” an essay that confronted the facile positivism of his age: “We have learned that we do not see directly, but mediately, and that we have no means of correcting these colored and distorting lenses which we are, or of computing the amount of their errors. Perhaps these subject-lenses have a creative power; perhaps there are no objects.”

CREATED BY LIFE FOR LIFE’S PURPOSES

The word biocentric simply means life-centered, which characterizes the creative design and purpose of the Universe and all its vast and multifaceted structure and content, both animate and inanimate.  In simple terms, the Universe is created by invisible Life to express Life through visible, material form.  In quantum terms, the Universe is created by Light as a dynamic mechanism for moving creating energy out of invisible, intangible wave-form and into visible, tangible particle-form.  Where we come into this dynamic equation is as a means on the ground floor of the Father’s House of Many Mansions for bearing the Light of Truth and bringing it to bear at the threshold of creativity where the invisible, intangible and inaudible become visible, tangible and audible.  In a word, we ground Consciousness for the Creator in the Heaven to create on the Earth—which was created as a womb for beauty to be born, to borrow a line from a hymn I shared in my Christmas Day message.

WE ARE THE LIGHT OF OUR WORLD 

My wife and I love to sit on the East bank of our beautiful lake and watch the sun set in the Western horizon, often glorified by clouds lighted and brilliantly colored by the rays of the sun.  On one occasion we observed how the sunlight, reflected off the surface of the waters, made a direct and separate path of light to each of us—not a single path of light, but two.  Then we remarked how each person on the boardwalk that evening had their own individual path of light from the setting sun.  This is also true for rainbows.  There are as many rainbows in a single sighting as there are human beings looking at what we might think is just one rainbow.  No two people see the same rainbow.  We each have our own.  Notice how the rainbow created in the spray of a lawn sprinkler moves with your movements.  It’s yours and nobody else’s. 

This gives me pause for deep consideration and meditation.  What does it mean?  What is this phenomenon telling me?  That I center a world?  That, like in the movie It’s A Wonderful Life, without me the world that I center would not exist, as though I had never been born—like with George Bailey’s wish his guardian angel Clarence granted him to show him how much his life meant and mattered to everyone in his world.  It’s a tear-jerker of a story for me every year, such a softy that I am.  Of course Clarence steals the show.  What really gets my eyes watering is the final scene where all the people in George’s world of care and service come to his rescue with so much love, generosity and robust appreciation.  That gets to me whenever and wherever I see it demonstrated. 

My life matters.  Now there’s an interesting and dynamic word.  Matters can have two meanings: counts as something and materializes.  My life counts a great deal to many, and it materializes as I live it.  It unfolds out of my consciousness moment by moment, day by day, year by year.  My living on Earth leaves a trail of forms, as well as relationships and friends, that came into manifestation and formed simply by reason of my presence and creativity in it.  I am responsible for a world that no one but I created—of course with the help of many other important people whom I’ve met in my journey—and that implies a shared consciousness, and a collective consciousness involving as many as draw near in creating a world in which to live together in community.  It’s a sobering thought when I stop to consider the implications, an obvious one being that I am not alone in this world.  We are one family of Man living on a relatively small planet adrift in a galaxy of heavenly bodies speeding through space and time.

Space and time?  What are space and time?  Do they really exist?  How do I know there is a vast cosmos “out there” set in motion by a “Big Bang” that allegedly occurred billions of years ago?  Years?  What is time?  How can the infinite be measured by the finite?  The ineffable by the effable?  Where does all this exist except in our own imagination, our own consciousness—two more interesting and dynamic words:  imagination is the ability of the mind to make images, and consciousness is a capacity with which to know.  They’re verbs, not nouns.  The Universe isn’t a “thing.” The Universe is a dynamic living organism, the nature of which scientists have only been able to speculate:

George Berkeley, for whom the campus and town were named, came to a similar conclusion: “The only things we perceive,” he would say, “are our perceptions.”

A biologist is at first glance perhaps an unlikely source for a new theory of the universe. But at a time when biologists believe they have discovered the “universal cell” in the form of embryonic stem cells, and some cosmologists predict that a unifying theory of the universe may be discovered in the next two decades, it is perhaps inevitable that a biologist finally seeks to unify existing theories of the “physical world” with those of the “living world.” What other discipline can approach it? In that regard, biology should really be the first and last study of science. It is our own nature that is unlocked by the humanly created natural sciences used to understand the universe.  (underscore added)

A deep problem lurks, too: we have failed to protect science against speculative theories that have so entered mainstream thinking that they now masquerade as fact. The “ether” of the nineteenth century; the “space-time” of Einstein; the “string theory” of the new millennium with new dimensions blowing up in different realms, and not only strings but “bubbles” shimmering down the byways of the universe are examples of this speculation. Indeed, unseen dimensions (up to one hundred in some theories) are now envisioned everywhere, some curled up like soda-straws at every point in space.

CONSCIOUSNESS AND LIFE

This brings us back to the quantum field out of which all forms emerge.  Consciousness and life, the very foundational realities that underlie the biological and chemical worlds scientists search and research, yet know nothing about but live to hopefully know what they are and how they tick before their time runs out.  Time: an illusionary convenience we invented to organize and schedule our calendars of events.  Space: an imaginary finite way of attempting to measure the infinitely eternal HERE an NOW.  

THEORIES ABOUND IN THE SCIENTIFIC MIND

Today’s preoccupation with unprovable physical “theories of everything” is a sacrilege to science itself, a strange detour from the purpose of the scientific method, whose bible has always decreed that we must question everything relentlessly and not worship what Bacon called “The Idols of the Mind.” Modern physics has become like Swift’s Kingdom of Laputa, flying precariously on an island above the Earth and indifferent to the world beneath. When science tries to resolve a theory’s conflicts by adding and subtracting dimensions to the universe like houses on a Monopoly board, dimensions unknown to our senses and for which not a shred of observational or experimental evidence exists, we need to take a time-out and examine our dogmas. And when ideas are thrown around with no physical backing and no hope of experimental confirmation one may wonder whether this can still be called science at all. “If you’re not observing,” says a relativity expert, Professor Tarun Biswas of the State University of New York, “there’s no point in coming up with theories.”

Absent the act of seeing, thinking, hearing—in short, awareness in its myriad aspects—what have we got?  We can believe and aver that there’s a universe out there even if all living creatures were nonexistent, but this idea is merely a thought and a thought requires a thinking organism. Without any organism, what if anything is really there?

For the moment, therefore, we’ll accept on a provisional level that what we’d clearly and unambiguously recognize as existence must begin with life and perception. Indeed, what could existence mean, absent consciousness of any kind?

. . . . This “Is it really there?” issue is ancient, and of course predates biocentrism, which makes no pretense about being the first to take a stance about it. Biocentrism, however, explains why one view and not the other must be correct. The converse is equally true: once one fully understands that there is no independent external universe outside of biological existence, the rest more or less falls into place.

We live, largely unaware, at the hub of creativity in a world that spins around us having materialized out of our collective consciousness.  This is one responsibility from which we cannot escape or run away from to some distant planet or moon.

We do not just have a consciousness.  We are consciousness itself, the capacity to know—in the biblical sense of that word as when Adam knew Eve and begot Cain and Able.  We are given the privilege and responsibility to engage in intercourse between Heaven and Earth to beget life forms that reflect the harmony and beauty of Heaven inherent in the many dimensions and frequencies of Light.  Through our eyes and consciousness the Creator can see and enjoy Creation—perhaps even bring it out of wave-form into particle-form where it can be seen and enjoyed. 

My friend in Loveland, Colorado, Jerry Kvasnicka, expressed this privilege with passion in a response to one of my blog articles:   

We are surely the lucky ones, to be incarnate in this body of flesh and able to sample all of sights, smells, sounds, tastes and other physical sensations combined with the thoughts, feelings and the ineffable essences that well up from the deepest recesses of the soul, all of which may visit us daily as we walk from place to place on this sacred Earth.   

I welcome any comments and thoughts you may wish to share.  Until my next post in this series, I wish for you a very Happy New Year and a healthy 2022.

Be love.  Be loved

Anthony 

tpal70@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crossing the Dark Threshold . . . . . . into the Light of Day

“Waves of anger and fear Circulate over the bright And darkened lands of the earth . . . .”    (W.H. Auden, September 1,1939)

Plato described the transition from the old self to the authentic Self as moving from out of “the cave” of isolation, where life is observed as confused reflections on the walls of the cave, into the light of day where one is fully engaged as a liver of life rather than an observer only.

Crossing the Threshold                                                    

This passage of the soul from out of the dark cave and into the light of day is made much easier with the assistance of a “spiritual midwife,” or mentor.  One need not go it alone these days with the many spiritual guides and personal transformation facilitators available. 

 One such spiritual midwife, and “guru” to many, is Dr. Joan Borysenko, clinical psychologist and medical scientist, who has done much work in body-mind healing and spiritual transformation.  She offers some professional insight into this process of transformation in a tape series entitled, “The Power of the Mind to Heal.” With her permission, I would like to share with you now an excerpt from these tapes, primarily for the grounding in the work-a-day world her words provide, but also for the profound gift she brings into the healing field through her expression and her deep and compassionate understanding of humanity’s state of amnesia, out of which many today are awakening and struggling to make sense out of the events of a dawning new age which we are all seeing and experiencing in a new way.

From Dr. Borysenko’s tapes:

   “The events that call us forth from Plato’s ‘Cave’ are different for each of us, and perhaps the best prayer in times of trouble is not to pray for the troubles to cease but to pray that our hearts and minds stay open to change so that we’ll emerge from our crisis transformed, wiser and more loving.

   “Unfortunately we’ve lost our cultural understanding of the value of darkness. Suffering and pain are downright unpopular in a culture that’s addicted to ‘positive thinking.’  But a lot of what passes as ‘positive thinking’ isn’t positive at all . . . .  A lot of us slap on a veneer of positivity and phony faith to hide a heart full of pain and fear.

   “The psychologist Carl Jung put it very clearly when he said that we can’t find the light by imagining good things.  The only way to the light is to go back out through the darkness.  Then we can emerge transformed with truly changed minds. 

   “The mythologist, Joseph Campbell, said, ‘one thing that comes out in myths is at the bottom of the abyss comes the voice of salvation. The black moment is the moment when the real message of transformation is going to come. At the darkest moment comes the light.’”

This has certainly been true in my own experience of dark times.  Another way this has been expressed is “The darkest hour is the one before the dawn.”  Some of my best days have been after two or three days of internal void and mental cloudiness, passing through layers in the veil. We may be fortunate to have had someone represent the light of Being to us so vividly and powerfully that we are able to forge a path all the way to the most sacred and holy place within us and perhaps even fuse in rapturous union with the Beloved, losing ourselves to the world and entirely into the arms of Love.  Sometimes, in such ecstatic experiences “in the light,” the path we forged with the help of another’s light closes up behind us and we lose our way back out into the world.  We leave the world to ascend the mountain of spiritual attainment and enlightenment, where we stay for a season knowing that we must return to the world we left behind.

Often we have to find our way back out on our own through a heart cluttered with fears and doubts and a mind rigidly structured with beliefs and prejudices of sorts we never even imagined were there.  This time, however, we have only our own light, which by now we have learned to shine, to light up the path leading out into the world of hard facts and experiences. For me, finding my way back out into the light of day where I could be of real value and service to others has been the greatest test of my spiritual awakening and transformation.  The most difficult of tasks has been to learn how to reach out and to touch people where they are.  I could not have done it without help, without someone to at least provide a sounding board for clarifying issues and validating my own gut perceptions and new-found sense of true self-worth.  One way and the other, both in going in to find oneself and in coming out to reveal the wonderful one I discovered my Self to be, one has to traverse the darkness of the cave where the false, isolated self spent its entire life wandering around in a solitary way.

Dr. Borysenko describes this transitional period from her professional point of view as represented quite often by physical, mental and emotional symptoms of so-called “dysfunction.”

   “Not only have we lost our appreciation of the value of darkness as an authentic path to the light, we’ve also lost the priesthood whose function it was to bring us through the transitions.  All too often our religious priesthood is as out of touch with sources of wisdom as is our secular priesthood—therapists and psychiatrists [and I would include here health care physicians] who think more in terms of pathology than they do of growth and potential.

   “We can learn a great deal about approaching these times of transition by observing how the priesthood of more primitive societies treats people in transition—whether the transition comes unbidden or whether it is set into motion by a special ritual or rite of passage.

   “The anthropologist, Victor Turner, is well known for his study of the ritual process in different cultures.  He defines a ritual as a ‘rite of passage,’ a transition between two distinct states of being, or stations in society.  The traditional rite of passageway in primitive cultures consists of three distinct stages: the separation from one’s previous state of being; the liminal period during which you dwell between two worlds, not here and not there; and the reincorporation afterwards into some new role or status in the society.

   “The ambiguous intermediate state of liminality is a kind of dwelling at the threshold of a new life.  It’s often compared to being in the womb, in a state of darkness and invisibility, or ‘wandering in the wilderness.’ The Jews wandered in the wilderness for forty years when they left bondage in Egypt, a time of dwelling at the threshold before they were re-born to a new life in Palestine. Jesus, too, wandered for forty days in the wilderness when he died to his old self, the carpenter, and was reborn to his God Self.

   “Each of us, in that very same movement from our separate ego to our God Self, has to do some wandering in exile and in this period we may feel confused, unhappy and like we have nothing left to hold onto.  If our culture hadn’t gotten so out of touch with the meaning of ritual and myth, we would know that this ‘no-man’s land’, the ‘dark night of the soul’ between the death of our old self and the birth of our new Self was grace, not ‘mental illness’ or ‘PMS’.”

What a wonderful and empowering attitude to hold toward a health crisis, or a life crisis, that might come our way seemingly just about the time we thought everything was going so well in our lives. I know for a fact, just from my own personal experience with physical illness, that unresolved inner issues come up to be addressed when the physical body is undergoing a viral cleansing, for example. One is compelled to be thankful for such interruptions sent by life perhaps to get one’s attention. It is believed by some psychologists that our own sub-conscious minds create the symptoms of dis-ease in order to alert us to the need to address important issues in our lives.   We can rest in assurance that all is well during times of crisis rather than tense up in fear of the unknown.  Healing can come quickly as we listen to our inner voice for the very specific message that will open the door to us for transformation. It is there if we are quiet enough, and honest enough, to hear it. Joan continues:

“The collective hypnosis—our unconscious adherence to the familiar beliefs that guide our lives—is broken in the liminal period, in that time of exile, in exactly the same way our own uncelebrated life crises strip us of what we know, delivering us to the threshold of the unknown. In times of transition we awaken from the familiar terrain of life and find ourselves in alien territory.  If we know that this frightening, unknown period was a necessary transition, like the transition period of labor, we could more easily ask for whatever help was needed, and more patiently hold on and wait for the birth.  We could take comfort that the process was natural, not pathological.    Each dark night and each little death peals away a layer of conditioning, restoring our sight so that we can see more clearly.  What a difference it would make if a person in the throes of a life crisis were called an ‘initiate’ and then skillfully led to a rebirth. Instead, our psychological initiates are often labeled neurotic, psychotic, addictive or character disordered, labels that create helplessness and low self-esteem. These labels reinforce the fearful story that we are damaged and less than whole.    Some of the power of the ‘Twelve-Step Recovery Program’ comes from the context in which addiction in placed. In anonymous programs, addictions are transitions between a life where the person was out of touch with a higher power and one in which the reality of that power becomes not only the force for recovery but also a renewal of the meaning of life. Addiction as a liminal experience, for those who are willing to see it in that light, creates excitement, empowerment and even gratitude for the addiction as a guide to a new, more self-aware and fulfilling life.”

It is one thing to admit that one’s physical body is addicted to a drug, such as alcohol, and to take the necessary steps toward sobriety and non-dependency.  It is another thing entirely to take on the label of “alcoholic” as one’s identity.  The statements “I am an alcoholic” or “I am a drug addict” can serve to dispel patterns of denial, but it isn’t the truth of who one is.  Such firmly held fixations in consciousness could come to hide awareness of one’s real identity.  This can set up a circular codependent relationship between condition and treatment in which one must continue being an “alcoholic” in order to participate in the process of treatment, and vice versa.  Further, one might be prone to think that, without that identity, one would become as nothing.

In the health field, similar situations arise where one becomes identified with the “disease” for which one is being treated.  To continue saying, for example, “I am a diabetic” fixes the condition of diabetes even more firmly in consciousness, which in turn creates the vibrational terrain that determines health and dis-ease in the body-mind continuum.  What if one were to say instead, for example, “I am fine.  My body, however, is having some difficulty handling sugar at this time, so I will withhold sugar from my diet until such time as I have corrected the reason(s) for the difficulty?” This, in my view, would be more accurate as well as the intelligent and cooperative first step to take toward a holistic approach to healing while engaging orthodox, traditional disciplines and therapeutic methodologies.   (Excerpted from Sacred Anatomy)

I will continue with this theme in my next post.  Thank you for sharing my meditations. I would love to share any thoughts you may have. Until my next post,

Be love. Be loved.

Anthony

tpal70@gmail.com

Apocalypse of Light 2013, Part 5: Questions Answered, page 5, Cosmic Consciousness

Deepak Chopra

Deepak Chopra

 

Deepak Chopra defines cosmic consciousness very succinctly: 

In cosmic consciousness the psyche or individual consciousness expands to a cosmic or universal level. The small personality with its identification with the body, the mind and relationships makes a radical shift so that the self now identifies with the non-local, timeless existence of the cosmos. So it is called cosmic consciousness. —Deepak Chopra

Walter Russell expands on the topic — and more — in the “QUESTIONS ANSWERED” part of his book THE MESSAGES OF THE DIVINE ILIAD.

Walter Russell

Walter Russell

 

Q. Did Jesus know all things? I mean by that, did He have omniscience?

A. Yes, He did have omniscience. He was undoubtedly the only man who had known complete Cosmic Consciousness. 

Q. Can a cosmic conscious man see Jesus as a person?

A. No one has ever seen the Person of Jesus-or Beethoven-or you. The body alone can be seen and the Person alone can be known.

Q. Are Jesus and God the same?

A. Yes, they are One-and so are you One with God when you know that you are.

Q. What is the Soul?

A. Soul is the desire force in Mind, the will to extend desire from the Light to manifest the Light
in form.

Q. How does desire manifest itself?

A. Without desire, the seed would not germinate into form. The Soul centers the seed in the pattern of desire to express form. The seed records the pattern of the body as it changes throughout eternity. The
record changes according to the desire of the Soul-will to become a different body. 

Q. Could you give an example?

A. Yes. The pattern of a tree in Maine where the winds blow hard is recorded in the seed of that tree. The same ruggedness of pattern will be recorded in the seed and repeated as the same kind of tree when the seed again unfolds. 

Q. Your statement that trees have Souls as well as human beings is rather extraordinary. Would you explain it further?

A. The Soul is universal in all things. It does not belong to man alone. God is Light. The Soul is DESIRE in the Light. It might also be termed the WILL.

Q. How does animal life differ from vegetable and mineral life?

A. What you call animal life is not rooted to earth. It has entirely different bodies which must interchange in order to continue. The vegetable kingdom is rooted to earth. The mineral kingdom is the earth itself.

All of these function alike. They all begin and end in the same way. 

Q. What are their relations to each other? Which comes first?

A. The mineral kingdom comes first-the planet is all mineral until sufficiently cooled by the coming of water. Interchange between water and minerals begets the vegetable kingdom.

Interchange between the vegetable and mineral kingdoms begets the animal kingdom. Each of these three depends upon each other or survival. Each is an extension of the other. 

I marvel at the depth and height of Russell’s understanding. A man who truly tapped the secrets of the universe and articulated the simple truth of it all.

I will end this series at this point to explore some of the profound perspectives and transcendent vision of Hugh Malafry as shared in his landmark and timely novel The Light at Lindisfarne. So, until next post,

Be Love. Be loved.

Tony's picture 2 from PeggyAnthony

Read my Health Light Newsletter online at LiftingTones.com. 

 

Apocalypse of Light 2013, Part 5: Questions Answered, page 4, Meditation

Tony's picture 2 from PeggyWe’ve been sharing excerpts from the chapter “Questions Answered” in Walter Russell’s 1948 book, THE MESSAGE OF THE DIVINE ILIAD. The question for today’s post relates to meditation. 

Until I actually sat down and meditated, as I do on some mornings when I arise early, I thought that meditation was a complicated and arduous spiritual practice. I mean, quiet the mind from thinking?! My mind?!  My mind never stops thinking.  At least what I used to think of as thinking: a mind busying itself in thought – inquiry, judgement, imagination, figuring things out, etc. That’s not really thinking. It’s entertaining thoughts passing through.  True thinking arises out of stillness when the human mind disengages itself from the stream of thoughts flowing through it and, like a turning water wheel, engages with the stream of consciousness flowing from above, down, inside and out.  My spiritual mentor says it very succinctly in these words from a poem he wrote:

. . . Busy thought and troubled feeling

Trespass not in virtue’s wise serenity

Where firm control and awful power eternally abide.

Here Earth’s pains are healed

And cruel chaos of mind’s spawning

Is called again to order and to beauty.  ( Martin Cecil, “Thus It Is”)

When I simply got still and listened to the sounds around me, I suddenly became aware that I am nothing more than the awareness that makes the sounds and sights in my world heard and seen. Without me, they simply would not exist. Then IT caught me and took me in.  IT being what I was using meditation to find by somehow “going in.” It came forth and found me once I got still enough and allowed the thoughts to enter and leave my mind without following them or chasing them away. You really can’t “go in” to find your Self.  Your Self has to come out into expression to be known through experience. Effortless expression is the key.  There’s no special technique or formula for meditation, as Russell suggests here: 

Q. I know that the wonderful freedom of easy breathing, just as the keenness of the senses, is closely associated with inner-feeling. Is there any simple rule that might be applied to bring about that condition of ecstasy which is characteristic of cosmic conscious people or even to induce meditation?

A. There is no necessity for a technique or formula for meditation. Inner-feeling, or inner-knowing, is the Silent Voice of inspiration within us. One automatically breathes easier as desire for effort ceases. The more forgetful one is of one’s body, the more one is freed for the transition from outer emotions to conscious stillness.

If one desires that ecstasy of being in the God-Light, breathing will become effortless. It will slow the heartbeat also by relaxing the body. One of the greatest means of relaxing the body is to stop thinking and meditate — to become one with the Spirit. 

That is the reward of living the conscious life-the most wonderful thing that can happen to anyone. 

A LENS AND A NET

The human mind is like a lens.  It provides the capacity for focus. As a vibrational substance which arises out of the physical body, it is responsive to energy passing through it, such as thought forms. It concentrates its substance around them in order to magnify them. Like a net for snaring birds, the mind has the ability to snare thoughts and blow them up, expand them and even build concepts on and around then so that they become heavy constructs that clutter the mind and prevent fluidity ad flexibility of thinking. 

Those thoughts can come from without and from within. It’s the ones that come from without that the mind is able to snare based on resonance and frequency size.  Like a net that catches birds but whose mesh is too large to snare butterflies, the mind can only snare large thoughts and concepts. The finer essences of spirit slip right through the net on their way out from within. This is how human being can remain alive, even with destructive thinking and behavior.  Life trickles through even the most crowded and structured mental capacities.

AN UNDERSTANDING HEART

The heart is a finer net that can catch the butterflies of inspiration. These inspirational thoughts lift up the heart and the mind to heights of profound awareness wherein the things of spirit can be contemplated, known and understood. Remember, it was King Solomon who asked the Lord for wisdom and an understanding heart.

There’s a Psalm that speaks of the “snare of the fowler” with which I would like to close this post and leave you to meditate upon. It’s Psalm 91. 

   He that dwelleth in the secret place of the most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty.

   I will say of the Lord, He is my refuge and my fortress: My God; in him will I trust.

   Surely he shall deliver thee from the snare of the fowler, and from the noisome pestilence.

   He shall cover thee with his feathers, and under his wings shalt thou trust: his truth shall be thy shield     and buckler.

   Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night; nor the arrow that flieth by day.    Nor for the pestilence that walketh in darkness; nor the destruction that wasteth at noonday.

   A thousand shall fall at thy side, and ten thousand at thy right hand; but it shall not come nigh thee.

   Only with thine eyes shalt thou behold and see the reward of the wicked.

   Because thou hast made the LORD, which is my refuge, even the most High, thy habitation;

   There shall no evil befall thee, neither shall any plague come nigh thy dwelling.

   For he shall give his angels charge over thee,  lest thou dash thy foot against a stone.

   Thou shalt tread upon the lion and adder: the young lion and the dragon shalt thou trample under feet.

   Because he hath set his love upon me, therefore will I deliver him: I will set him on high, because he hath known my name.

   He shall call upon me, and I will answer him: I will be with him in trouble; I will deliver him, and honour him.

   With long life will I satisfy him, and shew him my salvation.

All this is available for experience during meditation.  And it need not take an hour to become aware of it. Just be still and know . . . and it will find you more quickly than you can find it.  Until my next post,

Be love. Be loved.

Read my Health Light Newsletter on line at LiftingTones.com. The current article is “Celebrating 50 Years of Service.” Enjoy reading a brief synopsis of the fascinating history of chiropractic and my journey as a chiropractor and alternative healthcare practitioner.

 

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