Creating the New Earth Together

There’s a lot of talk on the web about fluoride and the pineal gland, so I’ll insert this short blog post into our current theme in order to share some light and perspective on the subject.

The Pineal Gland

First of all, there is more concentrated levels of fluoride in the soft tissue of the pineal gland than in any other soft tissue in the body.  Does it belong there? That is a question yet to be answered, as we really don’t have data acquired from studies of a pineal gland taken from a human that has not been exposed to fluoride.  I am inclined to believe that it does not belong in the pineal gland in such high levels of concentration, simply by reason of the fact that it tends to inhibit enzymes that convert the amino acid tryptophan into serotonin (a neuro-transmitter) and, in turn, serotonin into melatonin.

Unlike the brain, the pineal gland is not protected by the blood-brain barrier, so blood flows freely in and out of the gland.  Fluoride apparently passes directly from the bloodstream into the pineal gland, where it attaches itself to the tiny crystals that are floating around inside and covers them with hard mineral deposits.  X-ray images show them as white, bone-like lumps that serve as a landmark in the brain for detecting tumors. A tumor would push the pineal away from center in the direction away from the location of the growth.  

Fluoride seems to have an affinity for the pineal gland.  I suspect there is a vibrational factor involved that triggers a resonance in this trace mineral producing thereby a certain attraction to the vibratory frequency of the gland. That frequency correlates in musical terms to an F#.  So fluoride may vibrate at one of F#’s harmonic frequencies, such as A# or C#, the third and the fifth harmonics respectively.  Sounds plausible anyway, as all things in the body are vibraitonal in nature.  It’s all energy!

Then there are attractions between elements, and there are a few inside the pineal gland. Inside the pineal is a tiny crystal of sabulous (gritty) matter composed of phosphate and carbonate of lime, phosphate of magnesium and ammonia afloat in a transparent viscid fluid (water).  In a 2002 study of twenty different pineal glands, 100 to 300 microcrystals per cubic millimeter were found floating inside this fluid, largely composed of a common mineral called calcite.  Their shapes resemble the hexagonal crystals found in the inner ear called otoconia.  “These inner-ear crystals are known to be piezoelectric — which means they expand and contract in the presence of electromagnetic fields. . . .  Some, if not many, piezoelectric crystals also give off varying amounts of light.”  (Wilcock)

But that’s another topic for a future blog post.  It suffices to say that fluoride calcifies the pineal gland and in doing so may make it unable to convert serotonin into melatonin.  The research in this area  is on-going.

The consequences to health are numerous and significant.

A build up of serotonin, for example, in the pineal gland has been found to be associated with certain mental disorders.  The normal amount is 3.14-3.52 micrograms per gram of tissue.  That level has been found to be as much as three times higher in one schizophrenic case study, while in another study of a patient suffering from delirium tremens, the level was ten times higher (22.82 micrograms of serotonin).  High levels were also found in case studies of tremors, such as tardive dyskinesia, Parkinson’s disease and even epileptic seizures. 

Decreased levels of melatonin in the pineal gland have been associated with advanced onset of puberty and predisposition to MS (multiple sclerosis) symptoms.  Dr. Reuven Sandyk of New York has stated: “‘Dysfunction of the pineal gland can explain a far broader range of biological phenomena associated with MS, and therefore the pineal gland should be considered the pivotal mover of the disease.’ . . . Sandyk suggested that MS severity may be related tothe degree of pineal failure. . . .”   (Laurance Johnston via Wilcock).  Clinical studies have proven conclusively that MS is associated with pineal calcification. 

Perhaps a video would best explain the impact of fluoride on the pineal gland . . . and I just happen to have one for you.

 

TRACE MINERALS

There are seventy-two trace minerals that occur naturally in the human body.  They are called “trace” for good reason.  In trace amounts they are helpful in the body. However, in large amounts they become hurtful poisons. For example, Arsenic and Lead are well known deadly toxins, and yet we find them in trace amounts in our physical bodies.  Below you will find a list of the 72 trace minerals in our bodies which includes fluorine.

We will continue our theme of the Dawn of a Golden Age in my next post. Until then,

Be love.  Be Loved. ~ Anthony

72 Trace Minerals

Chromium
Carbon
Nickel
Bismuth
Manganese
Silicon
Selenium
Zinc
Boron
Cobalt
Lanthanum
Thalium
Thulium
Germanium
Beryllium
Thenium
Tin
Antimony
Cerium
Cesium
Arsenic
Zirconium
Strontium
Neodymium
Lead
Chlorine
Lithium
Bromine
Sodium
Yittrium
Gadolinium
Samarium
Titanium
Potassium
Iodine
Fluorine
Cadmium
Mercury
Dysprosium
  Rubidium
Erbium
Vanadium
Scandium
Yitterbium
Rutherium
Lutetium
Holmium
Praseodymium
Terbium
Barium
Tellurium
Niobium
Copper
Palladium
Halfnium
Tantalum
Tungsten
Molybdenum
Europium
Gallium
Gold
Osmium
Platinum
Rhodium
Indium
Silver
Thorium
Iridium


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