Creating the New Earth Together

Posts tagged ‘Cycles of War’

Wheels Within Wheels: Breaking the Cycles of War, part 2

“Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” 

(This saying is a paraphrase of the original words penned by George Santayana: “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”)

REMEMBERING OUR PAST

There have been several occasions when nuclear war has been averted in recent history. The most outstanding event occurred in 1983 when Stanislav Yevgrafovich Petrov, a lieutenant colonel on the Soviet Air Defense Forces, single-handedly saved the world from nuclear war by listening to his gut feeling about what turned out to be a nuclear false alarm. As the story is told by Wikipedia:

On 26 September 1983, three weeks after the Soviet military had shot down Korean Air Lines Flight 007, Petrov was the duty officer at the command center for the Oko nuclear early-warning system when the system reported that a missile had been launched from the United States, followed by up to five more. Petrov judged the reports to be a false alarm, and his decision to disobey orders, against Soviet military protocol, is credited with having prevented an erroneous retaliatory nuclear attack on the United States and its NATO allies that could have resulted in large-scale nuclear war. Investigation later confirmed that the Soviet satellite warning system had indeed malfunctioned.

(BREAKING NEWS: The US is withdrawing from an old Cold War nuclear arms treaty with Russia due to Russia’s failure to comply with the NIF agreement. This may trigger another nuclear arms race.)

This story speaks to the insecurity inherent in modern technology’s “Artificial Intelligence” when it involves vital information about threats to our national security.  It also speaks to the presence of spirit guiding us in our decision making processes, working at times through our gut sensing, as it did with this Russian lieutenant colonel. This is a past event worthy of remembering. 

THE CYCLES HAVE BEEN BROKEN

Looking back six decades to 1960 when the United States drew up plans to attack Cuba in what was actually a proxy war with the USSR, America’s long-time nemesis, we see the war cycle broken by players on both sides of these global-threatening conflicts: the Korean war and the Cuban Missile Crisis. I’ll let David Wilcock describe the details of these historical events in an excerpt from his controversial book The Synchronicity Key. 

(Remember, we are looking at the influence of zodiac cycles on global events and how The Hero’s Journey plays out in the lives of individuals and nations, as well as in the story of mankind’s evolutionary journey. The zodiac cycle of 2,160 years Wilcock explores here brings to light the mirroring of the Roman Empire’s warring years by our warring years this side of the zodiac cycle. This is as fascinating as it is educational for those of us who slept through history class — or were born in the post-war era, in which case you can learn what happened before your were born that got us where we are today.)

_________________________________________________________________

The Korean War–and a Chance for Peaceful Coexistence

The zodiac cycle gets slightly harder to follow once we see that the Sec­ond Punic War lasted until 201 B.C. [in the Age of Aries]–which is 1959 in our own Age of Pisces. Even though World War II seemingly ended in 1945 with Hitler and Japan’s defeat, the United States immediately began fighting another Cabal-financed superpower–the USSR. The Cold War started directly after the end of World War II with the highly deadly nuclear arms race, threatening all life on earth. This significantly raised the stakes from the previous age, as no matter how much Rome attacked and defeated its neighbors, life on earth was never threatened in an overall sense. 

The war against the USSR went hot from 1950 to 1953, when the United States battled the USSR’s hidden ally, North Korea, in the Ko­rean War. The Soviet Communists were supporting North Korea, while the United States was supporting the pro-Western regime of South Ko­rea. The United States considered this a fight against global communism, and the threat of a much bigger war with the USSR or China was always looming. Five million soldiers and civilians were killed in this war. The Cold War continued escalating after the Korean conflict ended in 1953, until a remarkable breakthrough finally occurred. On September 25, 1959, Russian premier Nikita Khrushchev visited the United States to meet with President Eisenhower. This highly influential visit occurred exactly one zodiac cycle after the Second Punic War ended in 201 B.C. This was the first time in the entire history of the Cold War that a Soviet leader had visited the United States.

As revealed on Politico.com, in this groundbreaking summit, Khrush­chev “denounced the ‘excesses’ of [communist] Stalinism and said he sought ‘peaceful co-existence’ with the United States …. In a joint communique, issued after two days of meetings, the leaders said…they believed that ‘the question of general disarmament is the most important one facing the world today.'” Although the talks didn’t last, this meeting was a key harbinger of a positive future, as it presented the people with a real opportunity to end the war, and achieve true, lasting peace.

Hardly anyone knew, at the time, that a very similar peace opportunity had occurred exactly 2,160 years before, when the second Punic War had ended in 201 B.C.

The Macedonian War

Rome’s taste of peace was very short-lived, as the Macedonian War be­gan the very next year, in 200 B.C. Macedonia is a very small country just north of Greece–and in our modern zodiac cycle, its equivalent may be Cuba…. In March of 1960, 2160 years after Rome attacked Macedonia in 200 B.C., the United States drew up plans to attack Cuba. The conflict between the United States and Cuba was another proxy war fought be­tween the United States and the USSR. The Soviet Union had made economic and trade agreements with Fidel Castro, the prime minister of Cuba, in February 1960, and the United States felt the need to mount an immediate counterattack. Cuba was directly southeast of the continen­tal United States, just ninety miles from the southern tip of Florida. This provided the USSR with a valuable strategic location from which to wage war–including the potential placement of first-strike nuclear weapons that would hit before the United States could effectively counter-attack.

On May I, 1960, the United States provocatively flew a U-2 spy plane over Russian airspace. The Soviets shot it down and captured the pilot, Gary Powers. The Cold War immediately restarted–precisely 2,160 years after Rome plunged into another war with Macedonia. Kennedy won the 1960 presidential election and was sworn in on January 20, 196I. In February 1961, very soon after his inauguration, Kennedy trusted his new, Cold War veteran advisers and authorized the CIA’s plan to invade Cuba. Air strikes began on April 14, 1961, in B-26 bombers disguised as Cuban aircraft, but the planes were quickly identified as belonging to the United States.

Kennedy was embarrassed and canceled the next round of air strikes, but the land invasion went ahead on April 17, 1961, at the Bay of Pigs.

Twenty thousand Cuban troops were waiting for the invading force of about fourteen hundred Cuban exiles who had been trained by the United States. The battle quickly ended with 144 of the exiles killed and 1,189 captured. This was a great embarrassment for the United States and immediately threw its fledgling president into full-scale crisis. In terms of the ancient story, the failed Bay of Pigs invasion would be seen as another all-is-lost point for the United States–a nationwide dark night of the soul in its battle against the Soviet nemesis.

Predictably, the USSR then began beefing up Cuba with weapons­ including nukes. This caused the United States and USSR to come very close to full-scale nuclear war during the Cuban Missile Crisis, which reached its peak on October 22, 1962. On this day, Kennedy addressed the nation to present solid evidence that the Soviets had positioned nu­clear weapons in Cuba. This was a tense third-act moment: The United States had regrouped, learned from the dark night of the soul in the Bay of Pigs disaster, and gained the strength to confront their own Soviet nemesis through its proxy state in Cuba. Out of a total of 1,436 B-52 bombers in the Strategic Air Command, fully one-eighth were sent airborne–to be ready to strike at a moment’s notice. US military forces worldwide were placed at DEFCON 2, requiring an increase in force readiness. Twenty-three nuclear-armed B-52 bombers were placed in orbit within striking range of the Soviet Union as well.

After a series of terrifying moves in a very high-stakes chess game, Khrushchev admitted what the USSR had done and announced it would pull back as of October 28. All offensive weapons in Cuba would be dismantled and returned to the USSR. This was a great triumph mo­ment for Kennedy and for America as a whole in the ancient Hero’s Journey story line, and the dramatic events have triggered multiple movies, novels, and TV adaptations. The last US missiles were removed from Turkey on April 24, 1963, ending the conflict on both sides. In Rome, the Battle of Cynoscephalae ended in 197 B.C.–exactly 2,160 years be­fore the Cuban Missile Crisis ended. The Battle of Cynoscephalae was the decisive turning point that led to Macedonia losing the war.

It’s not always easy to figure out what our modern equivalents may be for the countries against which Rome waged war. The Age of Pisces equivalent of Macedonia appears to be Cuba, but the USSR was the real nemesis lurking behind the scenes all along. It seems that the great cycles of history describe an overall script of what types of events will happen, but various characters here on earth will shift in and out of those roles, ultimately depending upon how the people in each cycle respond. And, of course, not all events fit perfectly into these cycles. Multiple cycles can be intersecting and colliding at once, providing a push-pull of competing influences that we may not be able to map out without a great deal more information and computer power. Nonetheless, it is amazing to see how well the biggest events, and the most significant wars, all seem to reappear so precisely across the zodiac cycle.

The Macedonian War did not actually end at the battle of Cynoscep­halae; it ended a year later, in I96 B.C. Although Kennedy was assassinated in November 22, I963, Khrushchev was ousted on October I4, I964–exactly 2,160 years after the Macedonian War finally ended for Rome. Although Khrushchev appeared to have been secretly working to negotiate peace treaties and alliances all along, he was still the primary figurehead for the USSR in worldly terms.

There may well be a vast wealth of other interlocking events that are not significant enough, in the Roman Empire, to be well documented as historical events–such as examples of music or theater that had as much of an effect as the Beatles would in the next cycle. There may well be a vast array of details that are repeating with equally stunning precision. This may all seem very hard to fathom, since we are used to thinking of time as completely linear. However, if we begin envisioning time as cycli­cal, moving through circular loops that are created by the celestial energy fields we move through as a planet, it makes more sense. Each time our planet reaches the same position in the circle, the events from previous rounds are much more likely to bleed through into our own reality-and repeat again.

______________________________________________________________

Looking back at these warring years, we can see how close we came to a nuclear destruction of this civilization. The next opportunity to break the zodiac cycles of wars comes in 1964 with the Vietnam War–which I will write about in my next post. Until then, 

Be love. Be loved.

Anthony

 

 

Tag Cloud