Creating the New Earth Together

As we celebrate Christmas and the dawning of a New Year, 2012, much anticipation stirs in human hearts and ominous speculation abounds in human imagination as to what is predicted to happen this year, culminating on the Winter Solstice.  My prediction is that we will finally learn – perhaps be forced to learn by some catastrophic event, such as the collapse of our economy or a major natural disaster  – that love and respect for one another is the only real currency between us that offers lasting solutions to our problems.  We will finally truly begin to love one another and our planet, our Home among the stars.  As promised, I will continue our consideration of the significance of the Pineal gland in our body temples and the pivotal role it is playing as the earth and its inhabitants experience the “Shift” to a higher frequency.  This excerpt is from my book Sacred Anatomy – Where spirit and flesh dance in the fires of creation.

Cut Out Without Hands

Uranda’s reference above to the “white stone” as being the “renewed Pineal Gland” reminds me of another place in the Old Testament of the Bible where a small stone is mentioned that plays a pivotal role in the history of the Middle East.   This reference is in the second chapter of The Book of Daniel the prophet.  It is such a wonderful story that I would like to consider it in all of its dramatic and significant details.

[This will take three of four blog posts. The story itself and the analogy I use is well worth revisiting at this time as we enter the New Year of 2012.]

It seems that Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar, having just besieged Jerusalem – something that occurred quite frequently in those days—had a dream which he summoned his soothsayers to not only interpret for him but to tell him the very dream itself, for he had forgotten it.  All he could remember of it was that it troubled his spirit so much that it woke him from his sleep.   Yet he could not remember the dream, so he summoned all the wise men of Babylon to remember it for him and interpret it.  When they could do neither, he was so furious that he commanded that they all be destroyed, along with Daniel and his fellows, Shadrach, Mishach and Abednego, formerly known by the names,  Hananiah, Mishael and Azariah, respectively.  To Daniel was given the name “Belteshazzar.”   Of course Daniel, who had not as yet had his chance at the dream, came to the king and did indeed tell him his dream as well as its interpretation.  This pleased the king, who then acknowledged that Daniel’s God was truly “a God of  gods, and a Lord of kings, and a revealer of secrets,”  so he showered Daniel with many gifts and made him ruler over all the governors of Babylon.  He also placed Daniel’s fellows over the affairs of the province of Babylon, with its hanging gardens, one of the “seven wonders of the world.”

The dream itself was of a great image that was fashioned of various ores.  His head was made of fine gold, his breast and his arms of silver, his belly and his thighs of brass, his legs of iron and his feet, interestingly enough, were made with a mixture of iron and clay.  What likely troubled king Nebuchadnezzar so was what happened in his dream to this image when a stone, “cut out without hands,” smote the image upon its feet.  The feet mixed with iron and clay crumbled and the whole image came tumbling down and all that the image was made of—the gold, the silver, the brass and the iron mixed with clay—was blown away by the wind so that nothing was left of it anywhere.  But the stone became a great mountain which filled the whole earth.

Daniel interpreted the dream as a prophetical outworking that would see the rise and fall of several empires, including Nebuchadnezzar’s Babylonian empire, which Daniel said was represented by the head of gold.  There would be other empires to come after the Babylonian empire, such as the Persian, the Grecian and Roman empires.  All would rise and fall.  The stone represented the kingdom of Daniel’s “God of heaven” which would be established during the reign of these kings and would remain to fill the whole earth after these other kingdoms had passed away.  This, of course, related to the Nation of Israel which came up largely right under the noses of the rulers of these empires.

This may also be seen as relating to any spiritual body of people who are drawn together by love to give collective presence of and expression to the Spirit of God.  Such gatherings start out very small and, to the extent they are consistently true to their purpose in spirit, bring a powerful focus of spirit to bear in human consciousness that has the ability to bring about change in the collective body of humanity and in the natural world.

[We see this occurring today as the collective body of Mankind awakens to the Presence of Love in the human heart.  Love in expression through human hearts is filling the whole world with light for those who see the light amid the darkness, the order coming out of chaos.  It takes an “attractor” to bring a new order out of chaos. That attractor is love for the truth of life and a willingness, nay a relief, in letting go of that which is not the truth of life.]

King Nebuchadnezzar, for whatever reason, was not content to simply heed the message of his dream.  He had a ninety by nine foot statue, or “image of gold,” erected “in the plain of Dura, in the province of Babylon” (Daniel 3:1).   Now Babylon was a province, or state—a collective, in other words, of many cities.

In the Bible whenever a city or state is mentioned it may be seen as a metaphor for consciousness, so that Babylon could be seen here as relating to the collective consciousness of humanity in which the human mind plays a focal role.  The mind is historically thought to be anchored within the brain.  As I mentioned above, it was considered at one time to be the origin of thought.   So I think its interesting, if not significant, that this “image of gold” was erected in the “plain of Dura” somewhere in Babylon.   The word “Dura,” as we saw above, is also used to identify the outer protective membrane of the brain and spinal chord.

In other words, this image could be seen as representing an image of gold held in the human intellect, gold representing love and what gold brings, namely power, as well as abundance and wealth. To Nebuchadnezzar this image of gold represented his many gods and the gifts of wealth and plenty these gods had bestowed upon him and his empire.    Having erected this gigantic idol, he commanded that, upon hearing the sound of the “musick,” everyone, under penalty of death in the fiery furnace, should fall down and worship the golden image.

As the story goes, it was reported to the king that Daniel’s three companions were not obeying his command, so the king had Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego bound and thrown into the fiery furnace to honor his decree.  So furious was he that these three friends of Daniel would not worship his gods that he had the furnace heated seven times more than it was wont to be heated. As we recall, the three men, who went into the fiery furnace singing songs of praise and thanksgiving to their God, were not burned by the fire but only their bonds, along with the men who had thrown them into the furnace, were destroyed, setting them free.

The king was suddenly “astonied” because of what he saw in the furnace: “Did not we cast three men bound into the midst of the fire?” he asked of his counselors.  “True, king” they answered him.  “Lo, I see four men loose, walking in the midst of the fire, and they have no hurt; and the form of the fourth is like the Son of God.” (Daniel 3:24-25)   Here is that vision again of the One standing in the midst of fire that is like unto the Son of God, or the Son of man as St. John called him.  There was a presence, in other words, that was of another dimension.

(To be continued)

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