Creating the New Earth Together

   The Holy Place of Creation

FROM MY READERS:  Neil Salka writes:  Some heavy duty thoughts you are writing about. Thank you. Love getting your posts.  In the last one about biocentrism towards the end, you write: “one fully understands that there is no independent external universe outside of biological existence,…..” now that thought alone stirs up in my mind: are you stating that we are actually/essentially dead outside of ‘biological existence’?  Dead in consciousness therefore no ‘life’ as we understand it? If there is no biological existence, what or where is life and consciousness? and then instead of: what happened in the second after big bang? it might be better to ask: where did my consciousness (life) come from? so life/consciousness came FIRST and then the body/biological existence. . . . first the Heaven, then the earth. Is heaven simply consciousness?

Great questions, Neil, both of which stop scientists in their tracks . . . and great segue to this post. Let’s explore your questions.

For as far back as I can remember, I’ve had a vivid awareness of being an immortal spiritual being. This awareness emphasizes itself as I move my arms to reach out and my legs to walk — presently as I move my fingers across the keyboard typing out the thoughts emerging through my mind while composing this blog post. 

Having studied the anatomy and physiology of the physical body, I am aware of the complex chemical, neurological, muscular, circulatory and skeletal systems involved in moving the various parts of my anatomy.  They work quite smoothly and cooperatively together with instantaneous precision in finding the right keys to type a word, a sentence, a complete thought.  That being so, I know that my brain does not decide nor originate my body’s movements.  It is clearly used in the process, along with all the other anatomical parts — and there are habitual patterns of movement developed simply by repetitive practice, such as in piano playing and typing.  But the brain is not the author nor originator of my movements.  The author and creator of my body’s movements is the immortal being that I AM incarnate in this earthen form — and, believe it or not, this has been proven scientifically.  Read on. 

In the following excerpt from Dr. Robert Lanza’s¹ book BIOCENTRISM,² he delves into the illusion of separate internal and external realities, which brings us to a consideration of the second principle of biocentrism — which I will let the author explain and develop in his own words.

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The Second Principle of Biocentrism: Our external and internal perceptions are inextricably intertwined.  They are different sides of the same coin and cannot be separated.”

First . . . simple logic must be used to answer a most basic question: where is the universe located?  It is here that we will need to deviate from conventional thinking and shared assumptions, some of which are inherent in language itself.

All of us are taught since earliest childhood that the universe can be fundamentally divided into two entities: ourselves, and that which is outside of us. This seems logical and apparent.  What is “me” is commonly defined by what I can control.  I can move my fingers, but I cannot wiggle your toes.  This dichotomy, then, is based largely on manipulation. The dividing line between self and non-self is generally taken to be the skin, strongly implying that I am this body and nothing else.

Of course when a chunk of the body has vanished, as some unfortunate amputees have experienced, one still feels oneself to be just as “present” and “here” as before, and not subjectively diminished in the least. This logic could be carried forth easily enough until one arrives at solely the brain itself perceiving itself as “me”—because if a human head could be maintained with an artificial heart and the rest, it too would reply “Here!” if its name were shouted at roll call. 

Now, this is a rather simplified, as well as divisive, description of “me” versus “you” and everything “out there” not enveloped within my skin.  We know, or at lease believe, that all is one and that there is no energetic separation between the multifaceted and diverse forms and entities in the Universe—and there is only apparent separation between the outer borders of physical forms in the Universe.  The question this doctor raises in his book is “Where is the Universe?” Where does it exist as far as we are concerned and aware?  According to the principles of Biocentrism, the Universe exists solely in the back of our cognitive brains, projected there by our eyes via the complex workings of the visual cortex.  

WHERE ARE THE SENSATIONS OF LIFE?

We can start with everything visual that is currently being perceived all around us — this book you are holding, for example. Language and custom say that it all lies outside us in the external world. Yet we’ve already seen that nothing can be perceived that is not already interacting with our consciousness, which is why biocentric axiom number one is that nature or the so-called external world must be correlative with consciousness. One doesn’t exist without the other. What this means is that when we do not look at the Moon the Moon effectively vanishes-which, subjectively, is obvious enough. If we still think of the Moon and believe that it’s out there orbiting the Earth, or accept that other people are probably watching it, all such thoughts are still mental constructs. The bottom-line issue here is if no consciousness existed at all, in what sense would the Moon persist, and in what form?

So what is it that we see when we observe nature? The answer in terms of image-location and neural mechanics is actually more straightforward than almost any other aspect of biocentrism. Because the images of the trees, grass, the book you’re holding, and everything else that’s perceived is real and not imaginary, it must be physically happening in some location. Human physiology texts answer this without ambiguity. Although the eye and retina gather photons that deliver their payloads of bits of the electromagnetic force, these are channeled through heavy-duty cables straight back until the actual perception of images themselves physically occurs in the back of the brain, augmented by other nearby locations, in special sections that are as vast and labyrinthine as the hallways of the Milky Way, and contain as many neurons as there are stars in the galaxy. This, according to human physiology texts, is where the actual colors, shapes, and movement “happen.” This is where they are perceived or cognized.

If you consciously try to access that luminous, energy-filled, visual part of the brain, you might at first be frustrated; you might tap the back of your skull and feel a particularly vacuous sense of nothingness. But that’s because it was an unnecessary exercise: you’re already accessing the visual portion of the brain with every glance you take. Look now, at anything. Custom has told us that what we see is “out there,” outside ourselves, and such a viewpoint is fine and necessary in terms of language and utility, as in “Please pass the butter that’s over there.” But make no mistake: the visual image of that butter, that is, the butter itself, actually exists only inside your brain. That is its location. It is the only place visual images are perceived and cognized.

Some may imagine that there are two worlds, one “out there” and a separate one being cognized inside the skull. But the “two worlds” model is a myth. Nothing is perceived except the perceptions themselves, and nothing exists outside of consciousness. Only one visual reality is extant, and there it is. Right there.

The “outside world” is, therefore, located within the brain or mind. Of course, this is so astounding for many people, even if it is obvious to those who study the brain, that it becomes possible to over-think the issue and come up with attempted refutations. “Yeah, but what about someone born blind?” “And what about touch; if things aren’t out there, how can we feel them?”

In the previous chapter, the author describes the tactile perception of a “solid” external world.

What about if you touch something? Isn’t it solid? Push on the trunk of the fallen tree and you feel pressure. But this too is a sensa­tion strictly inside your brain and only “projected” to your fingers, whose existence also lies within the mind. Moreover, that sensation of pressure is caused not by any contact with a solid, but by the fact that every atom has negatively charged electrons in its outer shells.  As we all know, charges of the same type repel each other, so the bark’s electrons repel yours, and you feel this electrical repulsive force stopping your fingers from penetrating any further. Nothing solid ever meets any other solids when you push on a tree. The atoms in your fingers are each as empty as a vacant football stadium in which a single fly sits on the fifty-yard line. If we needed solids to stop us (rather than energy fields), our fingers could easily penetrate the tree as if we were swiping at fog.

None of that changes the reality: touch, too, occurs only within consciousness or the mind. Every aspect of that butter, its existence on every level, is not outside of one’s being. The real mind-twister to all this, and the reason some are loath to accept what should be patently obvious, is that its implications destroy the entire house-of-­cards worldview that we have embraced all our lives. If that is consciousness, or mind, right in front of us, then consciousness extends indefinitely to all that is cognized — calling into question the nature and reality of something we will devote an entire chapter to: space. If that before us is consciousness, it can change the area of scientific focus from the nature of a cold, inert, external universe to issues such as how your consciousness relates to mine and to that of the animals. But we’ll put aside, for the moment, questions of the unity of consciousness. Let it suffice to say that any overarching unity of consciousness is not just difficult or impossible to prove but is fundamentally incompatible with dualistic languages — which adds an additional burden of making it difficult to grasp with logic alone. 

Why? Language was created to work exclusively through symbolism and to divide nature into parts and actions. The word water is not actual water, and the word it corresponds to nothing at all in the phrase “It is raining.” Even if well acquainted with the limitations and vagaries of language, we must be especially on guard against dismissing biocentrism (or any way of cognizing the universe as a whole) too quickly if it doesn’t at first glance seem compatible with customary verbal constructions; we will discuss this at much greater length in a later chapter. The challenge here, alas, is to peer not just behind habitual ways of thinking, but to go beyond some of the tools of the thinking process itself, to grasp the universe in a way that is at the same time simpler and more demanding than that to which we are accustomed. Absolutely everything in the symbolic realm, for example, has come into existence at one point in time, and will eventually die — even mountains. Yet consciousness, like aspects of quantum theory involving entangled particles, may exist outside of time altogether.   (To be concluded in my next post)

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THE IMAGINAL REALM OF CREATION

There’s a biblical passage that says “The thoughts and imagining of men’s hearts are only evil continually.” They don’t have to continue being evil.  I am here, along with a host of other incarnate angels, to change that, so that the world and the people in the world can be safe and made new in our consciousness.  

Consciousness can be seen as the “Imaginal Realm,” the Holy Place where creation and re-creation take place, and out of which creation emerges into the realm of visible, material form.  It is also the realm in which visions and visitations from heavenly beings take place.  Here in this vibratory garden the true design of form is seeded by Life from above and within the Heavenly Kingdom of heavens — the garden of consciousness being the heaven out of which the kingdoms of this world emerge.  It is also a vibrational workshop, so-to-speak, for re-creation and for making all things new again.  The image of our world being projected from “outside” into our consciousness is herein made available for our co-creative work of re-creation in the heaven.  “Behold, I create and make all things new!” is our intention and command as co-creators with the Creator and with one another.  Consciousness is, in that sense, an aspect of who we are.  I am consciousness and I create my world.  Collectively, We are Consciousness and We create our world together as one body of Man, male and female, made in the image and likeness of God. To participate with the Creator at this level requires that we relinquish our false temporary identity as creatures and rise up to take on our true and immortal identity as creator Beings.  I will continue along this vein of consideration in future posts of this series.  As always, I welcome your participation by sharing your thoughts.  Until my next post, 

Be love. Be loved. 

Anthony

tpal70@gmail.com

You may enjoy reading articles relative to health and wholeness on my HealthLight Newsletter blog: LiftingTones.com

REFERENCES:

¹ROBERT LANZA, MD, is one of the most respected scientists in the world—A U.S. News & World Report cover story called him a “genius” and a “renegade thinker,” and likened him to Einstein. Currently chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology and an adjunct professor at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Lanza has hundreds of publications and inventions and more than two dozen scientific books to his credit, including Principles if Tissue Engineering, recognized as the definitive reference in the field.  BOB BERMAN is one of the best-known astronomers in the world. He is Astronomy magazine’s “Strange Universe” columnist as well as the former astronomy columnist for Discover and it responsible for the astronomy section of The Old Farmer’s Almanac.

²BIOCENTRSM, How Life and Consciousness are the Keys to Understanding the True Nature of the Universe.  In recent years quantum theory has forced a sea of change in Western natural philosophy, casting doubt on traditional physical explanations of the universe’s genesis and structure. Biocentrism completes this shift in worldview as it takes on one of the key tenets of Western thinking: that all life ultimately reduces to physics. In its place it offers the revolutionary view that biology is primary — that life creates the universe, not the other way around.

Comments on: "Biocentrism 2: “Where Is The Universe?” Part 1" (2)

  1. Jerry Kvasnicka said:

    Once again, Anthony, you have hit the nail right on the head! I love the way you put it: “I am consciousness and I create my world. Collectively, We are Consciousness and We create our world together as one body of Man, male and female, made in the image and likeness of God.” Yes, I am a representative of the Creator here in human form on earth to bring the wonders of Heaven into the earth of my living.

    Here in the spiritual community where I live we have recently been meditating on the statement: “The mystery of God is finished on earth.” God has been a mystery to human beings because God is thought of as being separate–up there, over there, anywhere but here. So in an effort to connect with God human beings develop religions, philosophical systems and all manner of beliefs and practices to somehow bridge the perceived gap between themselves and the Divine.

    The deplorable state of humanity on earth is the result of this ignorance. Not until we individually and collectively take responsibility for finishing the mystery of God on earth by revealing Divine character in living will the body of humanity (which in reality is the Body of the Creator) begin to thrive again and return the earth to its rightful status as a sparkling gem in the cosmos.

  2. […] from where I left off in my review of Dr. Robert Lanza’s book BIOCENTRISM in my previous post, I will conclude the author’s consideration of this chapter.  Earlier on the author asks: […]

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