Creating the New Earth Together

Archive for the ‘Great Reset’ Category

New Heaven New Earth

“For, behold, I create new heavens and a new earth: and the former shall not be remembered, nor come into mind. But be ye glad and rejoice for ever in that which I create: for, behold, I create Jerusalem a rejoicing, and her people a joy.”  (Isaiah 65:17)

The Heart Nebula

ONE WAY OF PUTTING the “former” to rest is to give our rapt attention to the present and to what’s coming down the pipe, so to speak, in the way of a new heaven, while giving all our energy to co-creating a new earth—a world “a rejoicing, and her people a joy.”   

I see and hear evidence of a new heaven — a new consciousness — manifesting in and through various ones who speak on behalf of us all in the media and elsewhere.  In his Solstice consideration just recently, John Gray, a long-time friend and spiritual guide in Lake Elsinore, California, opened with words I feel are timely . . . and welcome as tone setters for the New Year: 

As calendar years draw to a close it’s usual to look back and assess the year that was. AJ Willingham, a writer for CNN, posted yesterday, “If 2020 has taught us anything, it’s that kindness and compassion have never been more important. It’s taught us that difficult times are made easier when we work together, when we take care of each other; when we reach out a hand to those struggling and lift up the heroes that protect us. It’s taught us that the best way through the darkness is to look for the light—and if there is none, to make it ourselves.” When the Washington Post asked readers recently to describe their experience of 2020 in one word or short phrase, they reported receiving over two thousand replies very quickly. The most common one-worders submitted were “exhausting,” “relentless,” “lost,” “chaotic,” and “surreal.” Those are understandable descriptives. But they aren’t words that I’d choose. How about you? The adjectives for 2020 that come to my mind are “attention-getting,” “opportune,” “progressive,” “confirming,” “rut-breaking,” and “uplifting.” Our experienced personal identities determine how we see things, of course.

John Gray’s presentation was subsequently entitled “Compassion.” In this regard he offered words of comfort during these times of grief as an aggressive virus sweeps across the globe taking a toll on human lives and social customs:

I looked up some statistics online an hour ago: About 1.7 million people worldwide are reported to have died of Covid-19 infection complications so far this year, with almost 320,000 of those fatalities in the United States—335,000 if we add Canada. I read that right now the Covid-19 daily mortality rate in America exceeds the number of people dying each day of heart disease and cancer combined. Globally in 2020, an estimated 60 million people died from all causes and about 150 million babies were born. That’s a lot of comings and goings, for sure, but as a proportion of the estimated total human population of 7.85 billion the increase was about 1%. These are just statistics of course, and statistics can be impersonal, even numbing. Let’s draw the matter in from the realm of numbers and closer to home: How many people died this year who you personally knew? How many children were born to people you know? I bet none of us would answer zero to either question; we all know of some departures and arrivals. For the most part, this is all seen as a normal part of human life experience. The coronavirus pandemic introduced a new element into the usual human view of life and death, however. We expect—and are maybe a little numbed to—people dying of heart problems and cancer, for examples, but this has added something different 

It’s human nature to grieve about death and loss. And there’s a lot of grief in the world. This may be especially felt by an individual when it is their loved one who died. The deep substantial connection known in life shifts with death of the physical body. Resisting this process produces a painful experience to the griever. I think grief may be second only to shame as the most painful emotion human beings feel. We feel grief when our heads and our hearts—facts and feelings—pull in opposite directions. A person may feel, “Maybe such-and-such is a fact, but I don’t want it to be and I don’t like it!” It’s this internal division that produces pain. We can understand a toddler’s tantrum, grieving loudly over being told “no,” but it becomes an irrational and irresponsible thing in a person who is chronologically adult. The pain of grief can feel so great that facts are not faced at all.

Grief is an invaluable way to internally deal with events like death, and it shouldn’t be run from. One of our roles as divine beings in human form is, as may at times be necessary, preside over a process of reconciling and realigning mind and heart in ourselves and in the world. I don’t think grief is something to get over. Its presence indicates, often sharply, the need for healing, for making whole. When the heart/mind divide is closed, grief is no more. Just a thin scar remains. Grief is not related to just bodily death, of course. This past year many people have mourned the demise of some comfortable norms of everyday social life. Some grieve the fact that they can’t get together with family and friends as in the past, or they are controlled by those feelings and do it anyway. How many grieve over the death of a rain forest, or of untold species of plants and animals? How many grieve the innumerable imbalanced conditions in the natural and manmade worlds, and the state of the planet itself.

Personal experiences of grief are connected to and are rooted in deeper collective experiences of grief in the whole body of mankind and of the planet. We are each, after all, inextricable parts of that whole and we share a deep subconscious past. Much of that remains unresolved, unhealed. This may help explain why feelings of grief may seem bottomless, as they sometimes do. We feel on behalf of the whole. Doing this is an aspect of our service.

Well, good grief!  What’s needed to comport ourselves effectively and well in the midst of all this? Dealing with grief is just a small bit of what is ours to give and receive and bless in the world, of course, but when it’s to the fore, it can seem pretty big. Spiritual leaders have for centuries emphasized the need for compassion—compassion for oneself and for one’s fellows; to uplift the afflicted. Compassion is defined in dictionaries as “having care and concern for the suffering or misfortune of another, often including the desire to alleviate it.” Both Greek and Latin roots of the word have to do with feeling the suffering and having empathy for another’s plight—and, to me, suggests extending understanding and a helping hand.

There is a well-loved passage in the Old Testament of the Bible which describes these essences so well:

“The spirit of the Lord is upon me; because the Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek; he hath sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty unto the captives… to comfort all that mourn; to give them beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness…” [Isaiah 61:1-3]

Anyone looking for a resolution for the New Year—and the rest of this incarnation— could hardly do better than adopt these words! The proclamation I quoted, attributed to the prophet Isaiah, comes from the same spiritual symphony as the basic teachings of Buddha a couple of centuries later. Per Wikipedia, “According to Buddhism, compassion is an aspiration, a state of mind, wanting others to be free from suffering. It’s not passive—it’s not empathy alone—but rather an empathetic altruism that actively strives to free others from suffering. Genuine compassion must have both wisdom and lovingkindness.”

Isaiah and Buddha were among enlightened ones who were forerunners to the coming of the one we call the LORD of Lords. What the Christ came to accomplish—minimally, the establishment of a nucleus collective body of spiritually conscious individuals—could not be accomplished the way it might have been had those close to him been more willing. In the New Testament portrayal of this, when this fact became evident, it is said, “Jesus wept.” [John 11:35]I can only imagine his profound sorrow. Not long after this point came his crucifixion. Notwithstanding that horrific event, his attitude toward everyone throughout this whole time was, “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.” [Luke 23:34] He demonstrated supreme compassion.

In his usual gentle and humble manner—as I have experienced his spirit over the years I’ve known him—John closed his consideration with these uplifting and encouraging words:

I confess that there have been times in my life when I’ve said, “Father forgive me, for I know not what I did.” Gradually I came to know with certainty that it is my anointed place—and it is each of ours—to extend the same qualities of forgiveness and compassion to all and to everything. Let us hold the world this way. It so needs us.

THE ARAMAIC PRAYER OF JESUS

As a way of holding the new world being born, and of closing 2020 and opening a New Year, I offer this Aramaic Prayer of Jesus as an invocation of the spirit of love, and as a carrier wave for an intention for peace and harmony throughout our world at the beginning of the year of our Lord 2021.  Saying this prayer, or listening to it, one can send forth one’s intention into the Universe while being released from all ties to the past and freed up to move forward into a new cycle with a clean slate, so-to-speak.

Aramaic is a sound-based rather than meaning-based language. When spoken or chanted, the tone of the words themselves go forth to cymatically, if you will, shape and inspire new forms with life.  It carries the spirit we send forth to accomplish absolutely that which we intend.  Above all, it sends our words before us to clear the paths upon which we are about to embark of all the clutter of yesterday’s successes and failures. It literally makes our paths new.

The invocation itself creates sacred space for the Great Spirit of the Father and Mother God to enter and be with us as we initiate this new cycle in 2021.

Praying this particular Prayer of Jesus helps us to come in his name (shem in Aramaic), or vibration, which is the vibration of love itself.  Love is, after all, the path of Truth we have chosen to walk in life.  We hereby set our direction and receive the energy and provision we will need to travel and serve upon this path. I invite you to listen to this video recording and simply be with the Aramaic words as they flow through your mind and body.

(There’s music after the “Amen.”  See the Aramaic words and translation below. There are other videos that follow this one with songs in Aramaic and Hebrew you may wish to view as well.) 

The Aramaic Prayer of Jesus

Abwoon d’bwashmaya

Nethqadash shmakh

Teytey malkuthakh

Nehwey sebyanach aykanna d’bwashmaya aph b’ arah

Hawvlan lachma d’sunqanan yaomana.

Washboqlan khaubayn wakhtahayn

aykana daph khnan Shbwoqan I’khayyabayn.

Wela tahlan l’ nesyuna

Ela patzan min bisha.

Metol dilakhie malkutha,

wahayla, wateshbukhta. l’ ahlam almin. Ameyn.

ONE ENGLISH TRANSLATION

O Birther, Father-Mother of all creation,

Your Name shines everywhere!

Release a space to plant your Presence here.

Envision your “I Can” now.

Embody your desire in every light and form.

Grow through us this moment’s bread and wisdom.

Untie the knots of failure binding us, as we release the strands we hold of others’ faults.

Help us to not forget our Source, yet free us from not being in the Present.

From you arises every vision, power, and song, from gathering to gathering.

Amen: may our future actions grow from here!

May this prayer open up new pathways in your life during 2021 to bring your unique gift of love’s light to your world . . . and may you have a Happy and Blessed New Year!

Anthony 

tpal70@gmail.com

Credits: For John Gray’s excerpts, gratitude to David Barns for his bog post at  https://greatcosmicstory.blogspot.com/ 

From an Old to a New World

“Unless the Lord builds the house, they that build it labor in vain.”

(Ps. 127: Solomon’s Song of Ascents}

I would like to initiate a conversation around the topic “From an Old to a New World.” I will start from where we are today in the midst of a global pandemic and go forward from here.  Where and how do we go from here? 

To initiate this conversation, I will publish a response from one of my followers in Ashland, Oregon to a link I received from another follower, and the brief conversation that followed.  If you have time to read, you may like to click on this link.  Here’s a synopsis of the story:

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • COVID-19 has been called the great equalizer, but nothing could be further from the truth. The disease clearly affects certain groups far worse than others, and the countermeasures implemented to quell the outbreak have been a phenomenal boon for wealthy globalists while decimating the lives of the rest.
  • Certain comorbidities significantly raise your risk of complications and death from COVID-19. Among the top ones are obesity, insulin resistance and vitamin D deficiency.
  • While the media and political and economic institutions claim the pandemic narrative is based on scientific consensus, this clearly isn’t the case. There’s no evidence supporting universal mask use and there’s even less scientific support for lockdowns.
  • While 45.5 million Americans filed for unemployment due to pandemic lockdowns, 29 new billionaires were created. The five richest men in the U.S. grew their wealth by a total of $101.7 billion (26%), between March 18 and June 17, 2020, alone.
  • Now, as reckless government overreach has destroyed many small businesses and engineered catastrophic unemployment around the world, world leaders are joining the World Economic Forum in calling for a Great Reset of the global economy that will benefit wealthy powerbrokers while enslaving and impoverishing everyone else.

Not everyone will agree with this article; I know some who will vehemently disagree with it.  Nevertheless, it’s out there and in the collective consciousness, which we all share and are a part of.  Concepts like this have a way of materializing out of consciousness into reality.  The Book of Job states this manifesting principle in the context of fear:  “For the thing which I greatly feared is come upon me.” (Job 3:25) 

Is a “New World Order” inevitable? 

I see words like “globalism” and “imperialism” associated with this new world order as not such good things.  Then I hear some saying globalism is a good and essential thing if we are to squelch this pandemic and save the planet, along with the human race.  One Facebook poster argued that we are all in this together and if you live on this planet you’re a globalist. 

Forces appear to be mounting their offences to attack—or take advantage of—the desperate situation we’ve got ourselves into.  We have a  World Economic Forum” taking shape.  We have “liberals” and “conservatives” competing for power and control of the masses, and for the world.  We seem to be working out of two minds collectively, a house divided.  What do you think and believe?  I asked my two sons in Oregon for feedback on the article and Leo responded:  

Leo: I like the part about not giving in to fear and taking responsibility for your own health. The rest of it smacks of the similar position I hear a lot of about everything from masks to mole children. I think a new world order is inevitable. Our long history of self centered luxuriating in societies of excess at the expense of unseen and outright denied human suffering and systemic decimation of animals and plants is playing out its final solution. If that takes humans having to come to balance by hook or by crook… Will it mean “slavery” to coexist in a world without abuse and exploitation? Will I want to live in a world where I can’t have anything I think I want? I’m hoping for a transformation into a more conscious and compassionate global society. I have no illusions that that won’t be possible without possibly loosing many of the “freedoms” I think I  may enjoy. . . .  Full scale civil breakdown is a realistic possibility.  And I don’t trust anybody in power right now. . . .  The age of Aquarius is upon us, It is time to transform.  I’ll be looking for the opportunities to give my energy to the creative outworking of love.

Me: Thanks for the feedback. You express from a place of authentic spiritual perspective, with which I resonate and which I value. Well said. . . .  What about civil disobedience and inviting law enforcement officials to cooperate with it and tell the “powers that be” NO!  (We will not enforce your illegal laws.)

Leo:  I wonder where the power actually lies. It’s the little people that make everything happen.  If you’re making more than 60K a year, it’s a good bet you’re not very hands-on much. 

Me: Yes, well I would increase the amount to maybe 120K. You’re talking about the corporate execs and politicians. Where would they be without the working class manufacturing and marketing their products and services?  We the people ARE the governing force, the very government. I’m not sure I would join in a mass disobedience demonstration in the streets. But I would agree with such a movement vibrationally.

Our interchange ended there. I invite input from others.  You can send your comments to my email below.  I will publish them in subsequent posts.

IMHO:  Unless we wake up and take charge of our faculties of mind and heart, a New World Order will insert itself into our lives.  Then it will be too late to opt out.  What do you believe?  Would that be a promising path from this old world to a new world?  Or would it be a path to imperialism, with a supreme ruler—a king on a throne and peasants complaining ceaselessly about taxation without representation?  Been there, done that. What do you want to see and have in your world?  What would it take for us to create “a more conscious and compassionate global society”

I look forward to your thoughts and to this conversation. Until my next post,

Be love. Be loved. Be awake!

Anthony

tpal70@gmail.com

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