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Archive for the ‘The Lord’s Prayer’ Category

The Prayer of Jesus – Abwoon

My Chorale PicI have always had a peculiar feeling of resistance when I hear the words “In Jesus’ name we pray,” with which preachers end their prayers – mostly Protestant and Baptist preachers, as rarely if ever have I heard Catholic priests utter these words. It just doesn’t ring true to me as something required of us in order to connect with God the Father in prayer. Jesus himself instructed that when we pray we should enter into our closet and pray directly to the Father in secret.

Now, I think I know the source of this tradition. Somewhere in the Biblical account of Jesus’ public ministry, he is recorded by the Evangelists as having indicated that “No one comes to the Father except through me.” He is also recorded as saying “Whatever you ask of the Father in my name, he will give it to you.” Later on the Catholic Church made it a dogma that states unequivocally that no one comes to the Father except through the Son.

Now, in the Aramaic tongue, which Jesus spoke, the word for name is shem, which means shimmer or vibration.  When someone is said to “come in the name of the Lord,” in Aramaic it means one who comes in the tone or vibration of love, love being the shem of Jesus, the Lord of Love. So, to ask the Father “in my name” is to ask in love, not to get something from God but to give something to God, namely glory, as well as to give something to one’s world, namely creative action.

When Jesus was teaching his disciples how to pray, he gave them what has come to be known the world around as “The Lord’s Prayer.” Interestingly, this prayer does not end with the words “In Jesus’ name we pray.” Nor does it begin with words invoking the Father through Jesus’ name.  According to the record, Jesus instructed “When you pray, pray thus: “Our Father, which art in heaven, hallowed be thy name…etc.”  Then it ends with these words – which, for some peculiar reason, the Catholic version of this prayer omits: “For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory forever. Amen.” (Matt. 6:9-13)

Jesus instructed his disciples to address the Father directly, and not as his Father but as “Our Father.” This leaves me with the impression that someone put a spin on this Gospel text. It seems they put words into Jesus’ mouth when they wrote the Gospels that have been handed down to us by Catholic theologians at the Council of Nicea. As we saw in previous posts, the Council of Nicea was convened by the pagan Emperor Constantine in the fourth century after Jesus (325 AD).  This was when the Catholic Church was created along with the dogmas that were to be taught and upheld by all Christians.

This was also likely when the phrase “In Jesus’ name” was owned and capitalized on by the Church, which in essence decreed that the only way to God was through the Church and its priesthood. This really does reveal the Judaic roots of Christianity. Judaism had its High Priest who alone was permitted to enter the Holy of Hollies in the Jewish temple. No one came to the God of Abraham except through the High Priest of the Temple. Direct communication with God by the layman was taught and believed to simply not be available. Yet, we have Jesus’ words instructing us to address the Father directly when we pray. I find this most interesting.

Where was Mother God?

What also strikes me as peculiar is the absence of the Divine Feminine, Mother God, in this prayer as it was translated from the original Aramaic text into the English language — and I may step on some patriarchal toes here. From my studies of the original Aramaic prayer of Jesus, I learned that the first word of this prayer, Abwoon, invokes both Father and Mother God, and the word for kingdom, malkuthakh, is a feminine word which means queendom and not kingdom. So, let’s have a closer look into the nature and purpose of this prayer of Jesus, which actually has ancient roots. It was a prayer that was used to initiate a new cycle of creative venture.

The Aramaic language is a sound-based language as distinguished from the meaning-based English language, so that in simply voicing this prayer out loud, one sends forth in his or her creative field energetic frequencies that begin to establish a new vibrational terrain – which we can call a “new heaven” – for the creation of something entirely new – which we can call a “new earth.” So, let’s have a look at each line of this Aramaic Prayer of Jesus.

The Aramaic Prayer of Jesus

As I said, Aramaic is a sound-based, rather than meaning-based, language. So, it really can’t be translated literally word for word. When spoken or chanted, however, it carries our spirit forth to accomplish absolutely that which we intend.  Above all, it sends our Word before us to clear the path upon which we are about to embark of all the clutter of yesterday’s successes and failures. It literally renews the path of our life’s journey so that something new may unfold that’s not a repetition of the past.

The invocation itself creates sacred space for the Great Spirit of Father/Mother God to enter and be with us as we initiate a new cycle. Praying this particular Prayer of Jesus helps us to enter his shem, or vibration, which, as I’ve said, is the vibration of love itself.  Love is, after all, the true path upon which we are to embark in co-creating and re-creating our worlds. We hereby set our direction and our intention and open our hearts to receive the sacred energy from Father God and the substantive provision from Mother God’s Queendom we will need to create and re-create our worlds. We do this in the name — the vibration, the shem — of the Creator,  as in the phrase “Hallowed be thy name.” Holy – and wholly encompassing of the All – is the vibration of the Creator of all things in the Universe.

Now, although the Aramaic words cannot really be translated literally, the vibration of the words of this prayer have a certain and specific quality that stirs a corresponding resonance in the “void” of the undifferentiated strata of creative dust out of which all forms are made. The following is one possible “translation” of this Aramaic prayer of Jesus offered by Sufi murshid  (senior scholar) Neil Douglas-Klotzl, from which I personally leaned to articulate the Aramaic words of this prayer.  I will give the Aramaic words followed by his translation. For a vocal rendition of this prayer, see the video on my December 26th , 2016 post.

Abwoon d’bwashmaya – O Breathing Life (or Father-Mother God)

Nethqadash shmakh – your Name (vibration) shines everywhere!

Teytey malkuthakh – Release a space to plant your Presence here. (Or: Let thy Queendom come now! is another possible translation).

Nehwey sebyanach aykanna – Envision your “I Can” now.

d’bwashmaya aph b’arah – Embody your desire in every light and form.

Hawvlan lachma d’sunqanan yaomana. – Grow through me this moment’s bread and wisdom.

Washboqlan khaubayn (wakhtahayn) aykana daph khnan shbwoqan I’khayyabayn.

Untie the knots of failure binding me, as I release the strands I hold of others’ faults.

Wela tahlan l’ nesyuna Ela patzan min bisha. – Help me to not forget my Source, yet free me from not being in the Present.

Metol dilakhie malkutha, wahayla, wateshbukhta l’ ahlam almin. – From you arises every vision, power, and song, from gathering to gathering.

Ameyn. – Amen: may my future actions grow from here!

There are a few other possible translations of the Aramaic Prayer of Jesus, which one can find on the WEB. They all essentially convey the same intention.

What opened my understanding and piqued my interest in this prayer is the expressed purpose for vocalizing it. In this prayer, as I said earlier, we have two invocations: one to Father God and another to Mother God. The invocation to Father God is to bring into one’s creative space the vibration of Creative Power. The invocation to Mother God is to bring into one’s creative space from out of her cornucopia, her “horn of plenty,” the provision needed to give form to one’s creative Word.

But the magic of this prayer is to be known as one takes the position of praying as God rather than to God; in other words, as a co-creator with Father/Mother God, rather than petitioning God to give me something I need in my life, something we are told by the Teacher that our Father in Heaven already knows. We pray our needs into existence rather than asking God to fill our needs for us. We do this in love but also as Love speaking the command “Let it be according to my Word.”

In Biblical words, we may say “Behold I create” – and I take full responsibility for my creation – starting with the most immediate creation and world of my physical body and temple — staying with it for as long as it exists and the substance that gave it form totally disintegrates and returns to the undifferentiated substance of creation – my world, my creation, my responsibility.

The rest of the prayer embodies and articulates a process of clearing one’s slate, so-to-speak, of all past experiences, both the good and the bad, the successes and the failures, one’s virtuous deeds along with one’s “sins” of the past, especially those “trespasses” that one has made upon others’ space, but also those that others have made upon one’s own space. “Untie the knots that bind me,” to others by reason of my judgments of them, and vice versa that bind others to me by their judgments of me. In other words, I release all things that may hold me back from pursuing my dreams and current creative imaginings. Then it ends with the command, “Let my future actions grow from here.” Or, in the words of Captain Picard, “Make it so!”

One can learn to articulate the Aramaic Prayer of Jesus is just a few weeks with the help of Neil Douglas-Klotz’s audio cassette tapes available from SoundsTrue.com. I learned it and could say it from memory in just two months and it stays fresh in my memory for instant recall. The Aramaic words seemed like deja vu to my tongue. I highly recommend it to my friends and blog followers.

The Lord’s Prayer

Here is a more timely version of The Lord’s Prayer, perhaps more current with the times and with the spiritual awakening underway in human consciousness. It was penned by Lord Martin Exeter, a British lord from the United Kingdom — who was also my spiritual mentor for some twenty years.

I am in heaven. The revelation of myself is holy. My kingdom comes because I am here. My will is done in earth because my will is done in heaven.  I give the bread of life in each moment of my living on earth.

I forgive, and that forgiveness is received by those who share the spirit of forgiveness. I lead no one into tribulation, but deliver all evil into the creative cycle.

For mine is the kingdom present on earth because I am present on earth. Mine is the creative power of the Word. And mine is the glory which results, shining round about, to be reflected by the world which I create.

So, with that I will say Adieu and, until my next post,

Be love. Be loved.

Anthony

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